It's software this time!

Should davesha skip the queue so he can work directly on the Pyra?

  • Yes

    Votes: 174 99.4%
  • No

    Votes: 1 0.6%

  • Total voters
    175
  • Poll closed .

NetBLOKS

Finally on-board
Joined
Nov 24, 2016
Messages
239
Location
Cologne
Website
www.netbloks.de
Unfortunately, I haven't received an e-mail either. Checked the spam folder, too.

I ordered end of January 2018. By the way, I'm No. 1103 according in the numbers image thread (https://pyra-handheld.com/boards/threads/the-numbers-image-thread.77461/page-42#post-1430331). Although generally the numbers image thread is not fully linear to the order history due to overlapping cancellations, in my case a direct association seems possible as I was the one that came in "fast forward to Saturday afternoon" in week 91 (https://pyra-handheld.com/boards/threads/weekly-pyra-preorder-stats.78477/post-1430408). Thank you levi for keeping track ;)
@EvilDragon already announced, that there was a problem with the last mail batch and that he will send another batch.
So to everyone, who has not received an e-mail:
There will be a "second" or a second half to the survey.
 

levi

Still fresh, damnit!
Joined
Oct 6, 2008
Messages
13,167
Location
Somewhere off the coast of the EU
That only affects people that selected german as a language on the shop I think. And judging by some of the other posts, the second german mail seems to have already been sent. If you're sure you've not got one yet, then alerting @EvilDragon either here, or as a ticket on the shop or something else I've not thought of (I guess you might get the quickest response if you ping him on @ twatter).

Edit: Depending on your mail handler service, it's possible it's fallen into some spam trap not accessible to you. The combination of 'survey' and some other weirdness seems to have sent some spam scorers erroroneously certain.
 

Caanunoo

Still Fresh
Joined
Aug 10, 2017
Messages
24
Age
47
Pyra 2GB or Pyra 4GB in memory, there was always a difference of 30 €, which for me is not excessive.
The Pyra 2GB was just the cheapest and easiest handheld to access financially for gamers who find the Pyra too expensive on the ED site.
For 30 € more, I take the Pyra 4GB, for sure.
The other versions of Pyra (with 3G/4G) do not meet my needs for playing, personally.
 

CFWhitman

Member
Joined
Mar 2, 2011
Messages
176
It's SATA II but not eSATA, @EvilDragon didn't check the differences before writing the technical specifications. See @hns' earlier post in this thread: https://pyra-handheld.com/boards/threads/its-software-this-time.99105/post-1675571
OK. In that case (which the included pictures appear to confirm) I'm wondering what the discussion about the power lines means since a SATA II connection doesn't carry power for the device anyway. As far as I know the only connection that carries power is eSATAp (though, as I referred to, a lot of eSATA devices aren't eSATAp devices and don't expect power from the connection anyway).

A regular SATA II connection as an external port will need either an adapter to convert to eSATA or some kind of power supply for a bare drive. Technically, using an internal, unshielded cable would also subject the connection to possible RF interference as well.
 

Grench

Forum Addict!
Joined
Oct 3, 2008
Messages
6,623
Wow - there seems to be a lot of confusion around the SATA piggy backing off of the USB 2.0 port by using a USB 3.0 physical port.

Frankly, if you're confused as to what this is - don't worry about it, you don't need it in order to use the Pyra.

What it is: A USB 3.0 physical port has more data lines than a USB 2.0 port. The port on the Pyra is a physical USB 3.0 port jack, but only has the USB 2.0 data lines being used for USB. The -other- data lines on the physical USB 3.0 port are wired to the SATA connection on the SoC. This way, with a simple adapter, the Pyra can directly 'see' a SATA device connected to these data lines. This is -not- a USB to SATA adapter. It is the Pyra being sneaky and using a more complex port to double the functionality of the physical space the port occupies.

Does that help?
 

levi

Still fresh, damnit!
Joined
Oct 6, 2008
Messages
13,167
Location
Somewhere off the coast of the EU
Originally, it was planned to use an eSATAp jack instead of that custom USB 3.0 jack solution. It wasn't possible to buy them anymore because they went out of production, though. However, the adapter still provides 5V via USB 2.0.
Yeah, but the adaptor doesnt have a buck convertor to provide even the 3.3V let alone the 12V. Now 2.5inch drives never need 12V, and most of them are okay with 5V only, but the adaptor doesn't give you a SATA power connector even.

Cheapest way round it as I see it is to buy a PC power supply brick that you screw into desktop systems, except you don't screw it in anything. Leave it on your desk and you'll have SATA power connectors coming out of your ears.
 

theredbaron

Very Active Member
Joined
Feb 12, 2014
Messages
116
Location
/home/theredbaron/
Yeah, but the adaptor doesnt have a buck convertor to provide even the 3.3V let alone the 12V. Now 2.5inch drives never need 12V, and most of them are okay with 5V only, but the adaptor doesn't give you a SATA power connector even.

Cheapest way round it as I see it is to buy a PC power supply brick that you screw into desktop systems, except you don't screw it in anything. Leave it on your desk and you'll have SATA power connectors coming out of your ears.
I would say something more like this :
Or a bit more and get a better one by itself:




Sent from my H3123 using Tapatalk
 

Letalis Sonus

Advanced Member
Joined
Mar 5, 2009
Messages
1,418
Yeah, but the adaptor doesnt have a buck convertor to provide even the 3.3V let alone the 12V.
Because 5V is the only voltage that is universally available on eSATAp. To quote Wikipedia:
There are only two versions of this port. Most laptop computers do not have 12 V power available, and have an eSATAp port which provides only 5 V. Desktop computers, with 12 V available, have a port with two additional pads, placed against the plug's "horns", which provide 12 V. Some manufacturers refer to these ports as eSATApd, where d stands for "dual voltage". Some devices, such as 2.5-inch drives, can operate off the 5 V supplied by laptop eSATAp ports. Others, such as 3.5-inch drives, also require 12 V; they can be powered from a desktop eSATAp port, but require an external 12 V power supply if used with a laptop computer. This can lead to confusion if users are not aware of the distinction.
 

CFWhitman

Member
Joined
Mar 2, 2011
Messages
176
Wow - there seems to be a lot of confusion around the SATA piggy backing off of the USB 2.0 port by using a USB 3.0 physical port.

Frankly, if you're confused as to what this is - don't worry about it, you don't need it in order to use the Pyra.

What it is: A USB 3.0 physical port has more data lines than a USB 2.0 port. The port on the Pyra is a physical USB 3.0 port jack, but only has the USB 2.0 data lines being used for USB. The -other- data lines on the physical USB 3.0 port are wired to the SATA connection on the SoC. This way, with a simple adapter, the Pyra can directly 'see' a SATA device connected to these data lines. This is -not- a USB to SATA adapter. It is the Pyra being sneaky and using a more complex port to double the functionality of the physical space the port occupies.

Does that help?
I am quite aware of all that, and there was never any confusion on my part about it. What I wondered about, specifically, was that, since the adapter appears to have a regular internal SATA port, why would anyone expect it to furnish power since internal SATA ports never furnish power to the drive? The only kind of SATA port that furnishes power to the drive is eSATAp. You can't tell the difference between a powerless eSATA port and a powered eSATAp port by looking at the outside of the port, so some might expect an eSATA port to furnish power when it actually didn't. Since the port appears to be a regular internal SATA port, there are no power lines to be missing power. There's no need to explain that the power lines are missing on an internal SATA port.

Perhaps the port on the adapter was intended to be an eSATA port, but that could not be sourced, so the explanation about the missing power lines is for a port they ended up not being able to use anyway. It would be more convenient if it were an eSATA port, even without power, but if they couldn't acquire the parts, the internal port that is on the adapter is better than nothing.

Edit: It looks like shielded cables with an internal SATA plug at one end and an eSATA plug at the other are not that hard to find, so it shouldn't be a big deal that the port is not eSATA.
 
Last edited:

Grench

Forum Addict!
Joined
Oct 3, 2008
Messages
6,623
There are a few things on the Pyra that are there simply because it is fun for hardware tinker oriented people to play with. SATA lines hidden in an otherwise innocuous USB 2.0 port, a microUSB charging port with serial coms, etc. Nobody should be worrying too much over the SATA data lines and that, "it isn't proper eSATA". It isn't there to be a traditional eSATA. The important bits are there so we can have what we need to tinker with.
 

λ the β-Redex Reducer

β-Redex Reducing Member
Joined
Sep 13, 2016
Messages
761
Age
50
Location
Lambda Centre
There are a few things on the Pyra that are there simply because it is fun for hardware tinker oriented people to play with. SATA lines hidden in an otherwise innocuous USB 2.0 port, a microUSB charging port with serial coms, etc. Nobody should be worrying too much over the SATA data lines and that, "it isn't proper eSATA". It isn't there to be a traditional eSATA. The important bits are there so we can have what we need to tinker with.
That's a nice way to suggest that it's a mess. Can hardware tinkerers not use proper eSATA?
 

TrashyMG

Sarcasm Dispenser
Staff member
Joined
Jan 18, 2010
Messages
10,836
That's a nice way to suggest that it's a mess. Can hardware tinkerers not use proper eSATA?
There isn't much difference between SATA and eSATA other than the shape of the connector and how much power can travel in the cable, depending if it is eSATAp or just regular eSATA. Power differences with eSATAp are handled with the Pyra adapter. lacking "proper" eSATA isn't a big deal to me as regular SATA cables are easily found and eSATA is a kind of fading out and I can foresee it getting harder to find these cables due to USB C.
 

CFWhitman

Member
Joined
Mar 2, 2011
Messages
176
That's a nice way to suggest that it's a mess. Can hardware tinkerers not use proper eSATA?
It would be more convenient if the port on the adapter were an eSATA port. However, since it wouldn't have power either way, and internal SATA to eSATA cables exist, it's far from the end of the world. My combination USB 3 / eSATA drive dock includes an eSATA cable that I won't be able to use with the Pyra, and I will have to get a SATA to eSATA cable instead. So I have a little added expense, but I will be able to use the dock with the Pyra if I want to.

Originally, it was hoped that the Pyra would have a USB 2 / eSATA combination port on the back like many laptops had several years ago, but the advent of USB 3, especially USB C, made those ports basically obsolete and they could no longer be sourced. The only alternative to leaving the SATA lines of the Pyra SoC unconnected and useless was to come up with some sort of custom solution. So, instead of using a regular USB 2 jack, they decided to use a USB 3 jack with extra contacts available and connect those contacts to the SATA lines of the SoC. In order to actually use those contacts, however, they also had to create a custom adapter which would feed those data lines to some sort of proper SATA jack or cable. At one time it seemed (at least to me) that the adapter was going to split out the unconventionally "wired" USB 3 jack to a USB 2 jack and an eSATA jack. However, it ended up being split out to a USB 2 jack and an internal SATA jack. This is again slightly less convenient, but not the end of the world.
 
Last edited:
Top