GamesCom, Shoulderbuttons and Heating


Granitehead

Advanced Member
Joined
Oct 16, 2009
Messages
3,011
Do you mean this?: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alemannic_German

Is it very different from other German languages?
It sounds completely different than standard German. You can easily find lots of Germans who don't understand it at all even in southern Germany where it used to be the primary language. Someone who just learned standard German hasn't got a chance to understand it.
 

thatgui

Advanced Member
Joined
Apr 2, 2009
Messages
3,048
And unfortunately, usually accents are impossible to lose.
You can't loose it, but you can hide it. My wifes from the north and I'm from the south. When she first met my family she did not understand a single word. All had to "accommodate" to that. I'm living in the north now too, no one guesses that I'm from the south, but if I want to, I can still talk in the dialect I grew up with, and no one around me understands a word :p

edit: sorry, my bad, you were talking about accents, not dialects
 
Last edited by a moderator:

Silent-Hunter

Hardcore Member
Joined
May 29, 2010
Messages
3,477
Do you mean this?: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alemannic_German

Is it very different from other German languages?
It sounds completely different than standard German. You can easily find lots of Germans who don't understand it at all even in southern Germany where it used to be the primary language. Someone who just learned standard German hasn't got a chance to understand it.
That's strange, I wonder how that happened. Usually places that are near each other have different but similar languages.
 

thatgui

Advanced Member
Joined
Apr 2, 2009
Messages
3,048
Do you mean this?: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alemannic_German

Is it very different from other German languages?
It sounds completely different than standard German. You can easily find lots of Germans who don't understand it at all even in southern Germany where it used to be the primary language. Someone who just learned standard German hasn't got a chance to understand it.
That's strange, I wonder how that happened. Usually places that are near each other have different but similar languages.
Well, as far as I know those dialects have a lot in common, but only the different forms of pronaunciation makes it cumbersome as it "garbled up" parts of the words (often endings) over time differently. And I am not entirely sure that small geographical distances are a decisive factor here, I think it mostly stems from local history > First thing that came to my mind is Welsh, its quite different from what the "invaders" from france, "saxony", nothern and baltic tribes brought onto the Island.
 

Granitehead

Advanced Member
Joined
Oct 16, 2009
Messages
3,011
Do you mean this?: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alemannic_German

Is it very different from other German languages?
It sounds completely different than standard German. You can easily find lots of Germans who don't understand it at all even in southern Germany where it used to be the primary language. Someone who just learned standard German hasn't got a chance to understand it.
That's strange, I wonder how that happened. Usually places that are near each other have different but similar languages.
Well, as far as I know those dialects have a lot in common, but only the different forms of pronaunciation makes it cumbersome as it "garbled up" parts of the words (often endings) over time differently. And I am not entirely sure that small geographical distances are a decisive factor here, I think it mostly stems from local history > First thing that came to my mind is Welsh, its quite different from what the "invaders" from france, "saxony", nothern and baltic tribes brought onto the Island.
They do have a lot in common, but it's not just pronunciation which differs, it's also grammar.

There used to be a slow transition from one language to another in all of the German speaking areas, and at least for the border to France (Alsace) I know that there they used to speak a language which was a mixture of French and German. That way everyone understood the people in their area. But then there were wars and people have become much more mobile, so people who originated far away from each other now lived together. That's why standard German was used more and more, which is the same for a huge area. Standard German isn't from anywhere near here (though I don't know where it actually comes from), that explains why there are/can be communication problems.

Communication problems between speaker of different Alemannic dialects can sometimes arise because the area where Alemannic was+is spoken is quite large. But those dialects (which can only really be considered to be still alive in Switzerland) are merging together and that's why those problems are more rare today.
 
Last edited by a moderator:

TeDaDeS

Advanced Member
Joined
Jan 15, 2004
Messages
1,288
Location
The Netherlands
Website
Visit site
I once was in Germany (looking for a house to buy) and I talked to a woman (German) that spoke a German dialect from that area, but my Dutch dialect matched hers. Really weird because I've never talked to someone with that particular dialect but I new exactly what she was saying. It wasn't the same as my dialect, I think it was a mix of German with local words and mine was the Dutch version. In the end I didn't buy a house there btw. But it was a new experience.


I imagine a brainchip with instant language skills might give a similar experience if those existed.
 

klapse

Central Scrutinizer
Joined
Aug 30, 2012
Messages
1,932
Location
Germany
Regarding heating, do we have numbers for the TDP of the Omap5 versus Omap3 SoC? How many more watts will the Pyra put out?
 

TeDaDeS

Advanced Member
Joined
Jan 15, 2004
Messages
1,288
Location
The Netherlands
Website
Visit site
I can't find the tpd, but I did find an article of omap5 presentation by TI stating it can get rather hot:

http://www.slashgear.com/omap-5-detailed-in-depth-27215706/

"The OMAP 5 is trying to address a realistic problem: a chip that needs to fit into a mobile device but will also be able to fit into a variety of other equipment. We have to be clever, says TI, otherwise the resulting device reaches a thermal envelope very quickly. On a PC the heat can go out the back, on a laptop the heat can go out the bottom and out the back, but when you hold a device in your hand, the heat has to dissipate."
 

klapse

Central Scrutinizer
Joined
Aug 30, 2012
Messages
1,932
Location
Germany
I wonder if TI (or any mobile SoC manufacturers) release TDP figures. Seems to be not the case. 

Maybe because the worst case load is never achieved in practice? Maybe because there is no standard way to run a complex SoC at "full load"?

I only found a couple of sites that tried estimating Thermal Design Power for selected mobile chipsets, unfortunately Omap3 and Omap5 weren't among them.
 

TeDaDeS

Advanced Member
Joined
Jan 15, 2004
Messages
1,288
Location
The Netherlands
Website
Visit site
I guess it all depends on trial and error. ED already tried stuff out, and I'm assuming it will get hotter than a pandora but not in unexpected margins.


Maybe some devices with an omap5 are always-on devices, those will heat up a bit anyway so you'll need some kind of cooling. I can imagine the pyra will be in open air (not a shelve/closet) and will not be used more than a few hours a day. Probably even downclocks when it gets to hot.
 

TeDaDeS

Advanced Member
Joined
Jan 15, 2004
Messages
1,288
Location
The Netherlands
Website
Visit site
Sure, but it would mean your omap5 would be really hot. So it either breaks or downclocks, but I agree that it shouldn't be common practice. Being linux I also think the behavior is programmable.
 

Neelix

Insecticidal Maniac
Joined
Jan 8, 2011
Messages
3,278
Location
Melbourne, Australia
Sure, but it would mean your omap5 would be really hot. So it either breaks or downclocks, but I agree that it shouldn't be common practice. Being linux I also think the behavior is programmable.
I think you may have missed my point.   I meant that it would be better to find another way to deal with heat - e.g. external radiation - so that it doesn't *need* to be downclocked to to keep it from overheating during periods of heavy usage. (when you're most likely to need every clock cycle for whatever purpose is driving the heavy usage)

- Neelix
 

TeDaDeS

Advanced Member
Joined
Jan 15, 2004
Messages
1,288
Location
The Netherlands
Website
Visit site
I don't think so. I'm describing worst case scenarios, so if the Pyra gets too hot it will probably be able to handle it without breaking or shutting down.

If the Pyra by default (the common practice I mentioned) downclocks because it always becomes too warm the design is flawed. But I don't think that will happen as it would have happened with the Pandora as well and also in ED's tests. And in the case someone doesn't like downclocking even when it gets hot you could probably disable it until the thermal safety kicks in and the device shuts-off (you can probably disable that also), but the person able to get his device this hot should write ED describing his setup so the design can be improved.
 
Top