Main PCB V3 is finished!


WizardStan

Mega GP Mania
Joined
May 24, 2008
Messages
16,733
32 Bit and 64 Bit Java makes just an enourmous difference onto the PC version, especialy stability wise.
On Windows, the 32bit Java runs in client mode while the 64bit version runs in server mode. I don't fully understand the difference but an old coworker of mine told me that server mode has better optimized floating point operations, hence why the 64bit version runs faster and more stably.In Linux, it's all server mode, 32 vs 64bit shouldn't actually make a difference.

This is going back about 3 or 4 years now, mind, so things may have changed, including my memory of the actual discussion.

edit: Pretty close, actually

with the exception of 32-bit Windows, the server VM will automatically be selected on server-class machines
 
Last edited by a moderator:

Neelix

Insecticidal Maniac
Joined
Jan 8, 2011
Messages
3,278
Location
Melbourne, Australia
In Linux, it's all server mode, 32 vs 64bit shouldn't actually make a difference
Except that the qualification "on server class machines"  means that this statement is not quite correct.  The important thing to note is the definition of server-class:

In the J2SE platform version 5.0 a class of machine referred to as a server-class machine has been defined as a machine with

  • 2 or more physical processors
  • 2 or more Gbytes of physical memory
The table that follows that quote shows that on 32bit linux machines that don't fall into that definition of server-class the client runtime is selected by default. 

I didn't find any documentation showing that the definition has changed since version 5.0.

- Neelix
 

WizardStan

Mega GP Mania
Joined
May 24, 2008
Messages
16,733
Fair enough. If nothing else, just give it a -server option and it should work fine.

Actually I should check that, make sure the ARM version of Java has server binary... It does. It even says in the docs "the default VM is client". I'll go suggest server mode in the Minecraft thread.
 

_jr_

Advanced Member
Joined
May 5, 2013
Messages
1,170
I've no experience with minecraft, but from what one can find about this issue on the internet it seems that the crashing problem is related to the fact that the 32-Bit VM is limited to a 1GB heap or something like that which may not be enough for heavy minecraft workloads.
 

hns

Well-Known Member
Joined
Dec 4, 2011
Messages
576
Location
Oberhaching
Wow, you are using EAGLE for this...

You know that with Altium Designer the design process (of both PCB and schematic) would be at least 3 times faster? Altium is more than 3 times more expensive though, but it's worth it.
No, we don't use EAGLE for the hard work, because it is missing some important features. In fact we use a tool (n/a for the public) that is similar to Altium from concepts, but a completely different piece of SW (runs on MacOS X for example). EAGLE is only used for capturing schematics (Altium isn't faster for that - we have tried a while ago) and sending the final results to PCB manufacturers etc. And to have a second Design Rule cross-check :) So this combination is more powerful and valuable than EAGLE or Altium alone (and it is impossible to combine them).
 

Exophase

Nothing good will ever come of Exophase.
Joined
Sep 21, 2006
Messages
10,308
Age
38
Location
Cleveland OH
On Windows, the 32bit Java runs in client mode while the 64bit version runs in server mode. I don't fully understand the difference but an old coworker of mine told me that server mode has better optimized floating point operations, hence why the 64bit version runs faster and more stably.

In Linux, it's all server mode, 32 vs 64bit shouldn't actually make a difference.

This is going back about 3 or 4 years now, mind, so things may have changed, including my memory of the actual discussion.
It could also be that the performance difference is because of the extra features in x86-64. Like more registers. That would lead to better optimized floating point.
 

Silent-Hunter

Hardcore Member
Joined
May 29, 2010
Messages
3,477
It's either hard float or soft float that works with the Pandora, and probably the Pyra too. We need whichever one it's not.
Pandora is using soft float, The RPi and the Debian version that the Pyra will most likely use will be hard float as well..  Now my question is if programs compiled on RPi's armv6 instruction set works nice with OMAP's armv7 instruction set. my guess yes, but it won't be as optimized as it could be. not to mention it may be a library nightmare to put together.


Are we done talking about this blocky game? 
Evidently not. :p

And wait just a minute! If the Pyra is hard float, won't Java not work on it at all?
 
Last edited by a moderator:

WizardStan

Mega GP Mania
Joined
May 24, 2008
Messages
16,733
Directly from here

Looks like they've given up trying to keep ARM directly in line with desktop for now, they've moved it to its own page with a different release schedule.
 

slaeshjag

¯\_(ツ)_/¯
Joined
Apr 8, 2010
Messages
2,687
Location
~Stockholm, Sweden
It has to be a really crusty old pick and place machine if it can't place the parts in an angle. Remember that most parts come on tape. If it couldn't angle the parts, all parts had to be oriented on the PCB like they sit on the tape :p
 

EvilDragon

Administrator
Staff member
Joined
Mar 4, 2003
Messages
29,824
Age
44
Location
Ingolstadt
Well, it was the only way we could fit everything on there :)
Not even through placing the surrounding holes a little bit different? Can modern populating machines place angled parts automaticly or does this one have to be placed by hand?Well, at least it looks pretty unique this way. :D
Well.... if you tell the USB ports to spread their legs so the holes can be moved, sure ;)

The holes are there for a purpose :D
 

Hồng Thất Công

Đả Cẩu Bổng Pháp
Joined
Dec 19, 2012
Messages
4,386
Location
Cái Bang
Well, it was the only way we could fit everything on there :)
Not even through placing the surrounding holes a little bit different? Can modern populating machines place angled parts automaticly or does this one have to be placed by hand?
Well, at least it looks pretty unique this way. :D
Well.... if you tell the USB ports to spread their legs so the holes can be moved, sure ;)


The holes are there for a purpose :D
AzB1hcA.jpg
 
Top