Absurdism corner

Why?


  • Total voters
    198

Null

Velocipede
Joined
Jun 16, 2007
Messages
10,918
Website
www.pixelfed.social
WEBSITE
https://elderberry.sdf-eu.org
Didn't think she was being serious. :)

The Internet is serious business young man, and don't you forget it. :p

The entire 1980s was a lie.

This cake proves otherwise.



Checkmate Atheists 80s deniers. :mad:
 

Phlyra

Electric
Joined
Jul 25, 2019
Messages
545
Didn't realise, the Necronomicon is a programming guide. ?
Ha! Nah but when people needed to look information up before the advent of electronics, information wasn’t just stored on paper but also on vellum.
Post automatically merged:

The Internet is serious business young man, and don't you forget it. :p



This cake proves otherwise.



Checkmate Atheists 80s deniers. :mad:
It was acceptable then :p
 

Phlyra

Electric
Joined
Jul 25, 2019
Messages
545
Yeah, but unless you follow the mantra that 'animals are people too', calves aren't people. And vellum is made out of calf skin.
Not only; as far as I’m aware that was the origin but vellum also refers to people’s skin too
Post automatically merged:

The cake could be a lie, there are precedents.
Indeed, in Westminster “the lies have it” and have spawned “cakeism”...
 

λ the β-Redex Reducer

β-Redex Reducing Member
Joined
Sep 13, 2016
Messages
953
Age
51
Location
Lambda Centre

FBnil

Pyraturi te salutant
Joined
Dec 14, 2012
Messages
3,704
Location
Yurp
Checkmate Atheists 80s deniers.
Those memories were implanted. The matrix we are in booted in 2199, however it runs the simulation as if we are in 2021.

so they could see where they were going.
Today everybody wears black, even during dark winterdays. I had to remove blood from my car hood like 5 times last year.

Here's a fact checker that proves that
Circular logic. Or self-referencing. Watch out for the double free. And Don't reference @Null , you'll get a NULL pointer exception

"They had subscriptions, to these magazines"
Expensive, and really hard to come by. I got to read 5 or so (always borrowed). There were also specialized ones for the C64 (my dad's) so I had to write the code over with a pencil on a sheet of paper, to keep it (faster than typing and saving to tape, did not have a floppy at the beginning)
I remember creating my own windows ("pane") using inline assembly in TurboPascal, all "borrowed" (and modified) code from good sources. And some books were like 500 pages with embedded examples, which you could reference back (but you had to know that small example existed AND that you could make it fit with what you were making at that moment, so you sort of had to know the whole book).
For example :
Now that we have more space, I still have a directory full of snippets, like for bash: how to use "trap" to create a temporal file that autodeletes itself when you press control+c (or if the application crashes).
Or a program to generate all the ANSI color codes in bash (works on the Pandora, run it, it looks very nice if you have a color terminal):
But to print those codes out you need to echo it like:
Code:
echo -e "\033[48;5;84mHello\033[0m World"
(use 38;5; for foreground color instead of 48;5; background color)
Or that Linux has tab expansions, but you can create your own tab expansions for a certain program.
Or that DOS could do a trick where you upload a font to RAM, protect the memory by lowering the available amount, and make the font pointer point to your font in RAM instead of ROM. Instant cool font (after designing your own on quadriculated paper and converting it to bytes).
Those are the nice/cool tricks you got/get to read from those magazines.
 
Top