Share your projects


PCXT

Very Active Member
Joined
Sep 14, 2016
Messages
253
Age
31
The cardboard wears in a form of fibers which accumulate on the outward parts of the "bearing", filling it. This works quite efficiently, only add the solution and tighten the mounting. After 6 or 7 attempts it looks like there is no need to tighten as it enters some kind of "steady state" of worn cardboard circulation.
The device does not exactly work by applying alcohol - it works by passing the ribbon through the alcohol+ink solution.
 

ClockworkCoder

Chaotic Neutral
Joined
Jan 21, 2016
Messages
1,585
Location
Menzoberranzan
Started building the Gigatron (https://gigatron.io/) - my version apparently has the version 4 ROM (mentioned here: https://hackaday.io/project/20781-gigatron-ttl-microcomputer/log/169989-micro-soft-basic-and ). The build process is documented step-by-step in the manual, and is designed to start you off getting more comfortable with soldering, and in each step there is a simple test (using a multimeter) they suggest you do to ensure each step goes as smoothly as possible. It's really well thought through, and even the chips are aligned on the foam in the box to match the layout of the board.

I'm currently just starting the process, and have the LED lit after completing the power circuitry. I'm taking it slowly, so this will take a few evenings to complete over the next week or two (normally you can do it in a single session, in around 2-4 hours).

The Gigatron case and chips:
Gigatron_Unboxed-Slight_Damage.jpg

Power circuitry working - LED is lit:
Gigatron_Step_2-LED_Working.jpg
 

ClockworkCoder

Chaotic Neutral
Joined
Jan 21, 2016
Messages
1,585
Location
Menzoberranzan
Interesting, i first heard about that yesterday, when i saw a YouTube video of somebody building the new MaxiMite Color 2 that they've just announced. Good job!
While it's similar, I don't think the Maximite is related(?). The Gigatron doesn't have a CPU at all (it's TTL based), and consists of components that apparently would have been available in the 1970's (apart from the Pluggy McPlugface keyboard adapter, which is an external add-on and enables BASIC programs to be loaded and run)

Sadly the guy who largely designed the kit passed away a couple of months ago (I just found that out recently from their forum), and there are no plans to produce more (although the other guy who helped originally design it, Walter, is still active and supporting the existing community).

The community is still developing mods, software and firmware updates. There are talks of a more compact 4-layer PCB version, and there exists mods to overclock and upgrade to 64k RAM
 

pmprog

DNF (Did Not Finish)
Joined
Apr 25, 2011
Messages
3,988
I must admit that they look interesting, though after buying an fpga dev board, i probably just invest some time into that instead.

Well, i hate to say it, I think all my current projects have bottomed out. I don't really know what to do. Part of me was planning on joining the GMTK2020 jam, but i don't usually get anything submitted to jams
 
Top