I'm alive and in Japan


ekianjo

Hardcore Member
Joined
May 7, 2012
Messages
8,261
Location
神戸市、日本 (Japan)
The Japanese are no longer the best at game development.
Did anyone mention anything about that? Well anyway this is certainly true and has been for a long time. Japanese people suck at social skills and game development in large teams is as much a technical challenge as a people management one.
 

ekianjo

Hardcore Member
Joined
May 7, 2012
Messages
8,261
Location
神戸市、日本 (Japan)
I wonder if a year is long enough for your experiences to turn sour.

http://kotaku.com/5484581/japan-its-not-funny-anymore
Kotaku is usually shitty in terms of contents but that article is right about many things.
How was fitting-into this somewhat insane culture for you?  Do you work a 9-to-5 job there?  Do you also have the obligatory company events?
Yeah I work a 9-to-5 (no let me correct that, 9-to-7 or later when needed) work here. I would not call the culture insane, you just need to understand where it comes from, and try to live in it and see what works for you. Over the years I have come to despise a number of things and appreciate others - I guess no matter where you live there's always a mixed bag of what you get out of it and what you have to compromise with. When I lived in Europe I was pissed up with a number of things that are now not a problem anymore in Japan, for example. 

The "obligatory company" events are a thing here, but I don't really have to experience that TOO much either because I work in a company that's not purely Japanese, so they are a little bit flexible in that regard. But I know people who do work (or have worked) in pure Japanese companies and it can get really heavy since the employers considers that you life == your life at work. After all, for most Japanese people, the family is split between the guy who works late and sometimes weekends for the company, and women who stay at home, sometimes have part time jobs and otherwise take care of the house chores and kids. Of course it's changing a little over time, but the pace of change is VERY slow - I don't expect the situation will be very different 10 years from now, especially since younger generations are not interested anymore to travel abroad or to learn foreign languages, so I feel Japan is closing on itself once more again. 

When we do company meetings in English in Japan, we need translators to ensure employees understand what we talk about. In China, we don't need translators anymore. You can see the difference - China has become way more outward looking while Japan is stuck in its old habits, island-like mentality. 
 
Top