Finding the "Two Months™"-post closest to the actuall pyra shipment date


λ the β-Redex Reducer

β-Redex Reducing Member
Joined
Sep 13, 2016
Messages
890
Age
51
Location
Lambda Centre
Sorry to break your narrative, but the sad truth is that they contain so much fat and sugar that they don't even need any preservatives to last that long, they're already that unhealthy to begin with. Some German Youtuber actually tested this with a fresh self-made burger - the result was basically the same, even self-made burgers are still too fatty to get moldy.
There's no need to be sorry because you're not breaking my narrative:

Pickle Slices

Ingredients: Cucumbers, Water, Distilled Vinegar, Salt, Calcium Chloride, Alum, Potassium Sorbate (Preservative), Natural Flavors, Polysorbate 80, Extractives of Turmeric (Color).
- https://www.mcdonalds.com/us/en-us/product/hamburger.html (emphasis mine)

It's McDonald's. Of course they can find an excuse to put preservatives in their hamburgers, oh ye of little faith.

I don't know. I just remember seeing a documentary show and one of the episodes had a segment about how the sugar industry is responsible for everyone thinking fat is unhealthy.
What about people who know that both are unhealthy?
 

λ the β-Redex Reducer

β-Redex Reducing Member
Joined
Sep 13, 2016
Messages
890
Age
51
Location
Lambda Centre
The English word maybe. But be careful with polisemy in Romance languages. There are flavoured variants but they're not intended for a healthy diet (healthy lifesyle might be, just not diet).
The word for preservatives in my first language sounds a lot like "conservative", hence my confusion. I sometimes spell English words that I know how to spell wrong just because I type quickly and partly revert to my first language.
 

λ the β-Redex Reducer

β-Redex Reducing Member
Joined
Sep 13, 2016
Messages
890
Age
51
Location
Lambda Centre
Well too much of anything is unhealthy.
But only for some things too much means anything at all.
Post automatically merged:

That Unboxing Video Stuff.....
...remind me on unboxing my "golden Pandora" :) :oops: ;)

Renember? :p

WOW A PYRA MADE FROM 24 KARAT PURE REAL GOLD USING SILVER CIRCUITS
 

Letalis Sonus

Advanced Member
Joined
Mar 5, 2009
Messages
1,443
It's McDonald's. Of course they can find an excuse to put preservatives in their hamburgers, oh ye of little faith.
Potassium sorbate - aside from being a naturally occurring salt - is commonly used for sauces like ketchup and mayonnaise. What a surprise.

How much sauce is being used on a burger? This kind of reminds me of the "product may contain traces of nuts" warning. You know what else is a common preservative? Ascorbic acid - look it up, you'll be surprised.
 
Last edited:

λ the β-Redex Reducer

β-Redex Reducing Member
Joined
Sep 13, 2016
Messages
890
Age
51
Location
Lambda Centre
Potassium sorbate - aside from being a naturally occurring salt - is commonly used for sauces like ketchup and mayonnaise. What a surprise.
Apparently it was a surprise to you, because you thought there were no preservatives in it.

If you want to change your argument from the lost case that they contain no preservatives to saying that they contain no harmful preservatives, then you might still be wrong.

First of all, it being a naturally occurring salt means nothing. Cyanide occurs in nature. And sugar —albeit healthy in it's natural form— is a common junkfood when refined that's known to damage the liver among other things. Yet, it's still a naturally occurring substance. Some refined sugars are even labelled raw.

Second, Potassium sorbate has been linked to many health ailments. Just look it up on scholar.google.com. Not all studies are conclusive, but they still indicate that potassium sorbate is a likely condidate for causing many ailments. So it's a risk to consume it and thus people who's health is important should avoid it.

Also, McDonald's hamburgers are a chemistry project. There's lot of things in there that are likely to be damaging to health. So by eating that one "food" you're actually taking many risks at once. Want to gamble that all those studies linking many of those ingredients to disease are misleading? That's fine, maybe you get lucky. It's your health that you'd be gambling with so it's your choice. But you are gambling with your health.

look it up, you'll be surprised.
I was not surprised. I'm not sure why you thought I would. I know that vitamins get chemical names; they are chemicals. Even water is a chemical. Was that supposed to surprise me?

Maybe you should look it up and be surprised. Ascorbic acid has been linked to kidney stones. It's controversial and thus could very well be fallacious, but I do not have the resources to personally verify the claims so from my perspective as consumer it's a risk to consume it. A relatively small risk compared to many of the other stuff that a McDonald's hamburger contains, thus I may consume it sometimes, but still a larger risk than most foods I typically consume and thus if I can easily avoid eating it then I will.
 

levi

Still fresh, damnit!
Joined
Oct 6, 2008
Messages
13,538
Location
Somewhere off the coast of the EU
Ascorbic acid is more commonly known as Vitamin C. Like all vitamins you don't need much of them, but you do need some, and you can easily eat enough Vitamin C by eating enough fruit and veg.

I wonder is this labelling of potassium sorbate as a preservative is purely a matter of differing semantics. Of course salts can be used to preserve things, look at kippers. It works I assume by soaking up free water, and making it too saline for the consumption of funghi and bacteria. But they are also added for flavour.
 
Last edited:

Letalis Sonus

Advanced Member
Joined
Mar 5, 2009
Messages
1,443
There's a lot of stuff vaguely linked to various ailments by studies with questionable methodology, which falls apart quickly once someone actually spends some time to do it right. My personal highlight was gluten sensitivity: The Australian professor that proofed its existence with a study in 2011 and basically fueled the whole gluten-free hype repeated the very same study some years later but did a much better job - and found absolutely nothing, it does not exist. Instead, the real reason people were observing less gastrointestinal problems with gluten-free products are FODMAPs, short chain carbohydrates that are already known to cause such problems - as it turns out, trying to adopt a gluten-free diet also gets rid of most sources of FODMAPs.
 

JDTAY

Half Pepperoni, All Cheese
Joined
Sep 15, 2015
Messages
1,347
Age
33
Location
North Carolina, USA
I'd hate to further derail this thread, but my older sister has my nephew on a gluten-free, dairy-free, and soy-free diet for autism, and it kinda pisses me off. My parents let me eat any food growing up, and even though I didn't turn out right, I was still doing better at my nephew's age than he is.
 

Letalis Sonus

Advanced Member
Joined
Mar 5, 2009
Messages
1,443
I'd hate to further derail this thread, but my older sister has my nephew on a gluten-free, dairy-free, and soy-free diet for autism, and it kinda pisses me off. My parents let me eat any food growing up, and even though I didn't turn out right, I was still doing better at my nephew's age than he is.
I used to have a colleague that married into a similar situation - it took him years of influence to nudge things into a more healthy direction, and most of the time he only achieved the bare minimum.

Parents like these rarely stop at just the diet, which easily escalates into really unhealthy situations for the kid - in more than just the medical sense.
 
Top