Let's move the moulds!


ClockworkCoder

Chaotic Neutral
Joined
Jan 21, 2016
Messages
1,719
Location
Menzoberranzan
(extra warning : it's ironic, I don't mean to bring anyone down)

You guys have got it wrong. Here's how to do it :
Make the case from cast iron. Now introduce it as a portable hotplate.
Remember, it's not a bug, it's a feature.
That's real multitasking! Compiling code while it's also cooking bacon and eggs :) Pyra Griddle (tm)
 

rygD

Nihilistic Mystic
Joined
Feb 28, 2014
Messages
7,464
Location
Everywhere
Does it come preseasoned? A good seasoning layer is important for all things cast iron :D
Somehow I lost an area of it on one of my pans, and it was still more nonstick than one of those copper ceramic whatever pans that have been popular recently (which did seem to resist sticking initially).

While browsing a store earlier I saw sets of cast iron pans on a shelf. One set has two of the three pans covered in rust, like someone put left them sitting outside for a while.

My biggest reason for being opposed to a cast iron case is the weight.
 

trix

Very Active Member
Joined
Jan 11, 2010
Messages
433
I used to overclock my xperia play to 1.8ghz stable.
Yep, and here's how that works: When you set your mobile device to a high clock rate, what you are actually changing is the maximum speed your device is allowed to reach at peak usage. When you do something CPU-intensive, such as compiling a large program (say, Xorg), that device will reach the maximum clock rate you set it to, for as long as it can do so and remain at safe temperature. Once the temperature exceeds the safety limit (and without active cooling, it will), the device will automatically clock down the CPU to bring the temperature down. Once the temperature is low enough, the device will bring the clock rate back up to the maximum you set it to again.

It will continue to go up and down like this until the compiling operation is complete.

Most of the time under normal usage you wont notice this, as when surfing the web and such, you only use the maximum clock speed for a few seconds at a time when loading a new page, which isn't long enough to heat the device enough to trigger the throttle. Compiling, benchmarking, and a few select other advanced operations can use the CPU at max for extended periods of time and trigger this throttling behavior, but most regular usage does not.

This is how all mobile devices that do not have active cooling (read: a fan) work.

So in the case of the Pyra, when Exophase says you will not be able to reach 1.5GHz for extended periods of time, he is not saying you wont be able to set the clock rate to 1.5GHz and have a stable device. Instead, I'm pretty sure he meant that, like all mobile devices, anything that maxes out the CPU for extended periods of time will trigger the throttling to keep the heat down.

How about a maximized liquid cooling system? Make the case bottom out of aluminum, tie it thermally to the SoC to act as a big heat sink/transport/radiator with the added advantage that it can transport heat to your hands - which gets pumped away by your circulatory system. Maximized liquid cooling.

Before the silly replies come in - not talking about 'insanely hot' here. By the time the heat would be distributed and transported to and through your skin it would max out in the 40*C range. Warm, but not going to singe or boil anything.
As a resident of Wisconsin (where it can get quite cold), I support this idea.
[doublepost=1510402220,1510401684][/doublepost]Any device made by an (ironically named) Evil Dragon should be able to produce much warmth.

I'm still awaiting the design that shares a USB port with a portable flame thrower. Call it "Dragon's Breath". That way my Pyra can be a pocket computer, a hand warmer, a cigarette lighter, a violence deterrent, and even more awesome to behold.

You could even use the butane chamber that the flame thrower is fed from as a backup power source, in a pinch.
 

crazyhorse

Newbie
Joined
Sep 9, 2009
Messages
345
Yeah your wrong there.You can set the governor to performance which locks the cpu at a certain rate.Drains the battery and not very good for the processor though.
 

Dark Pulse

Retreaux
Joined
Jun 12, 2013
Messages
189
Any device made by an (ironically named) Evil Dragon should be able to produce much warmth.

I'm still awaiting the design that shares a USB port with a portable flame thrower. Call it "Dragon's Breath". That way my Pyra can be a pocket computer, a hand warmer, a cigarette lighter, a violence deterrent, and even more awesome to behold.

You could even use the butane chamber that the flame thrower is fed from as a backup power source, in a pinch.
Yeah, with Christmas right around the corner, you may need your Pyra to be part of an elaborate boobytrapped house, to torch the scalps of some dudes named Harry and Marv.

In all seriousness, I'm sure it will be about as warm as a smartphone under heavier use. If anything, maybe even slightly cooler, owing to the fact it's got a lot more surface area than those, and bigger heatsinks - all of which can radiate heat more efficiently.

I'd be surprised if it could reach too high of a temperature unless you were doing something that's pushing the system hard. Even then, the autothrottle should help.

But hey, who knows. Someone could design an aftermarket cooler, and there's always the possibility of a CPU die shrink (unlikely, given no more OMAPs, but it might come via a different CPU) that will also produce less heat. The news about that Intel CPU paired with an AMD GPU is pretty interesting, and apparently they're likely to go into Intel's NUC line, among other things.

That's still (probably) a bit too big and dissipating too much heat for something like a Pyra... hmm... maybe we can take a cue from the Switch, make some kind of dock extension or something...

Either that, or the new device would have to have a new shell that could accommodate that, a much beefier heatsink (if not a fan), and so on. While the Switch isn't exactly pocket-sized, it's still definitely bag-sized, but now I think I'm talking more about something that'd be for a Pyra successor rather than a swap-in CPU board. TDP for it would be about 2-3x the Switch - Tegra X1's TDP is about 15W, but this combination of CPU+GPU would be aiming more for 35-45W. Probably nothing some generous heatsinking and a non-rinky-dink fan (seriously... the Switch's fan is pretty runty, if you have one you know what I mean) couldn't cure, but it'd definitely mean upping the size to at least Switch-like levels.

ED is free to correct me or chime in with his musings if he so wishes. :p

Hold on a sec. How do they... stuff him ? xD
Must be a with a zucchini.
Croutons and Bac-Os. What else would it be?
 
Last edited:

levi

Still fresh, damnit!
Joined
Oct 6, 2008
Messages
12,887
Location
Somewhere off the coast of the EU
The intel/amd parts look massive compared to anything ARM I've seen lately. Maybe the CPU's comparable to an old QFP ARM2/3 in a socket, but those weren't also burdened with a hot GPU. Modern ARM chips come with the GPU in-die and the overall form factor is about thumbnail sized or smaller as far as I've seen.

I wouldn't put it past many of ptitseb's ports in particular to stress that CPU+GPU combo in a particular performant way for almost as long as you're playing them. We may need to reduce settings to enable longer spans of gameplay that don't stutter.
 
Top