Pyra YouTube Lawyer Simulator: A Game Based Around YouTube Lawsuits! (Need Help Developing)

DalebitGames

Newbie
Joined
Apr 20, 2017
Messages
1
Age
21
Well, I decided to actually make an idea for once, and it's an Ace Attorney clone for the Pyra based around satirizing YouTuber's lawsuits and criminal charges as well as the American law system (the charges only get less and less ridiculous).. Unfortunately enough, I think I'd have a hard time developing it myself, since I don't know how to code much and I'm terrible at art and sound. It would take place in 2018 (the defense attorney's name would be Neil Impartial) and have fictional cases that are designed to be as realistic (or as ridiculous) as the concept designers wants them to be. I'm looking for the following people:
Lead developer: Speaks with everyone else.
Concept designers: Must design concepts.
Programmers: Must be capable of programming the game using whatever tools are available to them.
Artists: Must be capable of creating the art the game needs.
Animators: Must be capable of creating the animations the game needs.
Sound and Music creators: Must be capable of creating the sound and music the game needs.
 

directive0

Very Active Member
Joined
Apr 8, 2015
Messages
789
Location
Toronto, Canada
Listen, I ain't trying to rain shade on your picnic, but in my opinion you are going about this ALL wrong.

An idea alone is very worth little in this crazy internet world. I can't imagine anyone is going to want to make your game for you if all you can contribute is an idea or a story. The hard work is taking an idea and making it something real with it. The worst part is you've taken your great idea and basically given it away on here!!! What's to stop some asshole from just taking your idea and cutting you out?

But I have good news; It has never been easier to be a jack of all trades. Even with no background in coding, art or design YOU TOO can make a game. How do I know this? In just under a few months I've gone from knowing a few lines of Commodore BASIC to starting to write my own games. They suck, but they're all mine and one day I might even share them with the world!

My advice to you is to pick up a python tutorial, learn pygame and bang out a very rudimentary prototype of what you want to make. THEN try to attract help. If some schlomo like me can do it YOU CAN TOO!

I wish you all the best, and I hope you find some help. If not heed my advice! I BELIEVE IN YOU!

I leave you with this maxim:

 

kuru

Laptop und Trachtenjanker
Joined
Oct 8, 2008
Messages
2,893
Location
the mockracy
That post made me smile. There's that thing I'd like to make but somebody else would have to do all the work involved.
Ideas are a dime a dozen. People who implement them are priceless

I'd say be your own concept designer.
Try your game idea on paper with a friend in RL. Observe closely, write down what you find and iterate based on that.

Who's your intended audience? Why only Pyra? SDL runs on a number of platforms. Target PC first.
Can you come up with enough diverse cases to keep the game intersting? Try writing a few based on RL.
Is finding evidence or debunking false claims in this medium varied enough to make for interesting cases?

There's a lot of material to read out there.
https://www.theoryoffun.com by Raph Koster
and the Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses by Jesse Schell
On Youtube there's the channels Extra Credits and GDC.
 

pmprog

DNF (Did Not Finish)
Joined
Apr 25, 2011
Messages
3,943
Ideas are a dime a dozen. People who implement them are priceless
I hear that a lot, but I heard something very interesting on TIGsource a while ago, where somebody came in saying "I've got great ideas, do my work for me", one guy turned round and said "Actually, you can get any developer in to make something, but actually having a good idea is actually a hard thing".
I suppose the difference is between having an "idea" and having a "good idea" :)
 

JonnyH

Member
Joined
Aug 9, 2014
Messages
85
Location
(No longer) PowerVR
I suppose the difference is between having an "idea" and having a "good idea" :)
Plus, a "single sentence" idea is dime a dozen. Something where all the mechanics and interactions are thought through and well defined is *not*. An "elevator pitch" is nowhere enough to start developing a game in my opinion (unless you intend to "find it as you go along", which means it probably won't look like the initial idea at all, so questions the benefit that "idea" gave)
 

ible

professional vim user
Joined
Mar 24, 2014
Messages
2,266
Location
Seattle, WA
also, you might have to worry about youtube lawyers coming after you if you don't "distinguish" the name enough ;).

yes, i have a million ideas myself, and have ok skills in all the above categories; probably the best way to accomplish them is to figure out first how to clone myself.
 

Swordfish II

Very Active Member
Joined
May 20, 2015
Messages
899
Well, I decided to actually make an idea for once, and it's an Ace Attorney clone for the Pyra based around satirizing YouTuber's lawsuits and criminal charges as well as the American law system (the charges only get less and less ridiculous).. Unfortunately enough, I think I'd have a hard time developing it myself, since I don't know how to code much and I'm terrible at art and sound. It would take place in 2018 (the defense attorney's name would be Neil Impartial) and have fictional cases that are designed to be as realistic (or as ridiculous) as the concept designers wants them to be. I'm looking for the following people:
Lead developer: Speaks with everyone else.
Concept designers: Must design concepts.
Programmers: Must be capable of programming the game using whatever tools are available to them.
Artists: Must be capable of creating the art the game needs.
Animators: Must be capable of creating the animations the game needs.
Sound and Music creators: Must be capable of creating the sound and music the game needs.
I'm not trying to be an ass... But what are you bringing to the table that someone would want to join in?

Edit: Everybody else already addressed it. I designed am android app for work based on someone idea (not my job at all.. I just like to tinker). Just a rough proof of concept to get things going which took 7 hours. The non-tech folks complained:
1. Why isn't it fully complete
2. Why did I do x, y and z
3. I don't like a, b, and c
4. Then told me to finish it completely, for free, on my own personal time, and turn the source code over to them.

Yeaahhhh.... I really should file a patent because they will end up building something like it and after how ridiculous they were they deserve it.

[doublepost=1494028192,1494028045][/doublepost]
I hear that a lot, but I heard something very interesting on TIGsource a while ago, where somebody came in saying "I've got great ideas, do my work for me", one guy turned round and said "Actually, you can get any developer in to make something, but actually having a good idea is actually a hard thing".
I suppose the difference is between having an "idea" and having a "good idea" :)
It's true as long as you can PAY the Dev. Then it doesn't matter what the idea is, it will come to life.
 
Last edited:

Penguin-Guru

Still Fresh
Joined
Sep 29, 2016
Messages
42
All the naysayers are right, ideas are cheap, but I have a slightly different take on it:

Ideas being a dime-a-dozen is all the more reason to share your ideas willingly. Most people will be too lazy to steal your ideas anyway, and those people who have some level of motivation should have plenty of other things occupying their time already. People can't just drop everything and pick up some new idea, it's much easier to share the work with other people. This distributes the risk of failure and carries all the benefits of teamwork and collaboration. I think the value of collaboration itself is generally greater than the value of a good idea without a plan for actualisation. Even if 10 ideas get stolen, that 11th idea might introduce you to a couple people who change your life. It's not a bad risk, especially in an accepting and motivated community like this.

Let me know if you're going through with it and I'd be happy to consult on the game, business, or marketing. Same offer to anyone with such ideas, just drop me a P.M.
 

FBnil

Waiting to Champion the Pyra to the World...
Joined
Dec 14, 2012
Messages
2,968
Location
Yurp
heyman_aceattourney.jpg


Ok, nobody gives the right type of incentive, let met get you started:

1. An artist will need concept art first. you do not need much talent for that, just effort. (take images that already exist, change them a bit, very roughly)
2. In order to know what needs to be drawn, and what backgrounds are needed, you need a playbook (what happens where, who is there, who says what.)
3. Once you have that playbook, you can start on dialog, sketches, and which soundfx you will need.
4. If your idea looks good on paper... start searching for a game engine that already does what you want. You now look if it will work on android, windows, etc. Then re-adjust your game for target demographics.
5. So, the game engines for your specific game are here: http://aceattorney.wikia.com/wiki/List_of_Ace_Attorney_case_makers
And do not forget the awesome: http://www.court-records.net/Fanworks.htm
6. Learn the engine and what it can do, adjust your playbook to that (for example, if the engine can not make it rain in realtime, then use a prerendered background with rain... and some raindrop effects)
7. Now it is time to attract more people. You have the concept art for the artist. You have the game-engine and so the developer knows what skills are required... more people with defined roles can be faster, but it means you can not stay on your own pace, it will be a collective pace....

Remember, if it is funny (for example, uses the meme images, but has clever dialog, then people will play it). We here love pixelated games, because it is about the fun and the skill not the looks (a little bit though, but not that much). And it must be fun for you too. It is the journey, not the product you are experiencing.
[doublepost=1498675672,1498673928][/doublepost]
heis.jpg
He is going to object to everything you say














rage.jpg
 

Klumpen

Run away! Run away!
Joined
Nov 19, 2011
Messages
8,482
Location
Uncanny Valley
That's like saying
"I have a great idea for a painting, now I just need someone to paint it"

That's not how things work, learn to paint make it. There are plenty of tools including game makers that don't even need coding skills although those limit you quite a bit if you can't add your own code, I guess.
 

TeDaDeS

Very Active Member
Joined
Jan 15, 2004
Messages
894
Location
The Netherlands
Website
Visit site
I listened to a guy that wanted to have his own comic and he had great ideas for it. He tried drawing them but he wasn't the best artist. He found someone to draw for him and he saved up money and pay him 100euros per page. After a long while he had a full comic and had that printed. Assuming it was about 22 pages long that would have cost him 2.200euro's to draw and some more to have it printed.

You can always try to do coding yourself and pay people to create art, animations, sounds and music.
Just keep in mind that the average cost of creating a commercial mobile game is $300.000 already.
You could probably do it for a lot less but it will cost you a lot of time, time you can't spend on earing money (so not being paid doing your own work if not free, it's also an investment).

You can find a lot of examples of people trying it themselves (just search for it):
https://www.digitaltrends.com/gaming/how-to-make-a-video-game/
 

rygD

Nihilistic Mystic
Joined
Feb 28, 2014
Messages
7,445
Location
Everywhere
How will they know if people are sending them messages about wanting to join the team? Maybe they have email notifications on.
 

PowerGod

Advanced Member
Joined
Jun 20, 2011
Messages
3,155
I listened to a guy that wanted to have his own comic and he had great ideas for it. He tried drawing them but he wasn't the best artist. He found someone to draw for him and he saved up money and pay him 100euros per page. After a long while he had a full comic and had that printed. Assuming it was about 22 pages long that would have cost him 2.200euro's to draw and some more to have it printed.

You can always try to do coding yourself and pay people to create art, animations, sounds and music.
Just keep in mind that the average cost of creating a commercial mobile game is $300.000 already.
You could probably do it for a lot less but it will cost you a lot of time, time you can't spend on earing money (so not being paid doing your own work if not free, it's also an investment).

You can find a lot of examples of people trying it themselves (just search for it):
https://www.digitaltrends.com/gaming/how-to-make-a-video-game/
The "One Punch Man" manga was born as a bad drawn web comic... then a real artist took the idea and made it beautiful
 

FBnil

Waiting to Champion the Pyra to the World...
Joined
Dec 14, 2012
Messages
2,968
Location
Yurp
He's probably in the middle of committing 100% and can't deal with all this fluff, seeing how last login was when posting that first post.
maybe we scared him/her away?
 

ible

professional vim user
Joined
Mar 24, 2014
Messages
2,266
Location
Seattle, WA
The "One Punch Man" manga was born as a bad drawn web comic... then a real artist took the idea and made it beautiful
ONE has excellent story telling skills (and a funny premise, and excellent characters built around that premise), and actually went forward with drawing/self-publishing. all three adaptations (original webcomic, the manga, and the anime) are excellent, despite varying art styles. when i get "bored" of one, i tend to go reread/rewatch another :D.
 
Top