COVID-19 / Coronavirus Pandemic


TeDaDeS

Hardcore Member
Joined
Jan 15, 2004
Messages
1,379
Location
The Netherlands
Website
Visit site
Thanks. Combined with the other paper you sent earlier, doesn't look bright.
Although I also found this post from the CDC which appears to highlight this risk in their data already:
"The findings in this study are subject to at least six limitations. First, the risk estimates from this study reflect the risk for myocarditis among persons who received a diagnosis of COVID-19 during an outpatient or inpatient health care encounter and do not reflect the risk among all persons who had COVID-19. Second, misclassification of COVID-19 and myocarditis is possible because conditions were determined by ICD-10-CM codes, which were not confirmed by clinical data (e.g., laboratory tests or cardiac imaging) and could be improperly coded or coded with a related condition (e.g., pericarditis). Third, encounters for COVID-19, myocarditis, and COVID-19 vaccination occurring outside of hospital systems that contribute to PHD-SR are not included within this data set. Fourth, underlying medical conditions and alternative etiologies for myocarditis (e.g., autoimmune disease) were not ascertained or excluded. Fifth, the obtained measures of association could be biased because of the choice of the comparison group (all patients without COVID-19) and if physicians were more likely to suspect or diagnose myocarditis among patients with COVID-19. Finally, the findings represent a convenience sample of patients from hospitals reporting to PHD-SR and might not be generalizable to the U.S. population."
Link: https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/70/wr/mm7035e5.htm

They also appear to include the known risk of myocarditis from covid compared to the vaccination:
"Since the introduction of mRNA COVID-19 vaccines in the United States in December 2020, an elevated risk for myocarditis among mRNA COVID-19 vaccine recipients has been observed, particularly among males aged 12–29 years, with 39–47 expected cases of myocarditis, pericarditis, and myopericarditis per million second mRNA COVID-19 vaccine doses administered (6). A recent study from Israel reported that mRNA COVID-19 vaccination was associated with an elevated risk for myocarditis (risk ratio = 3.24; 95% CI = 1.55–12.44); in the same study, a separate analysis showed that SARS-CoV-2 infection was a strong risk factor for myocarditis (risk ratio = 18.28, 95% CI = 3.95–25.12) (4). On June 23, 2021, the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices concluded that the benefits of COVID-19 vaccination clearly outweighed the risks for myocarditis after vaccination (6). The present study supports this recommendation by providing evidence of an elevated risk for myocarditis among persons of all ages with diagnosed COVID-19."

And highlight that they should take this into account in their vaccine strategy:
"Myocarditis is uncommon among patients with and without COVID-19; however, COVID-19 is a strong and significant risk factor for myocarditis, with risk varying by age group. The findings in this report underscore the importance of implementing evidence-based COVID-19 prevention strategies, including vaccination, to reduce the public health impact of COVID-19 and its associated complications."

However this nuance, that appears to be known, doesn't always reflect in local policies.

Example of small things that are missing nuance:
If you look to the CDC covid death counter, there is no explanation about how to read this information: https://covid.cdc.gov/covid-data-tracker/#cases_casesper100klast7days
It's just: these people tested positive for covid and died.
When you look at the same data for vaccine deaths: https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/vaccines/safety/adverse-events.html
You get a clear warning: "Reports of adverse events to VAERS following vaccination, including deaths, do not necessarily mean that a vaccine caused a health problem.".
While that statement is completely true, why wouldn't you always want to make clear how to interpret the presented data. I see it's only done for the vaccine data, while you would like to have accurate data for covid deaths also (I mean, these are thrown around in the news without any nuance, the higher the better). I bet the covid counter is way less accurate, but we really don't care as it's into the millions anyway. But you could at least be consistent and state that this data probably isn't accurate with the notion that it doesn't change the fact that covid probably caused most of them. I mean people use to die also, we can probably check all the expected deaths and see if other usual reasons of death are much lower now.

Example, flu deaths in the US under 18 years old:
Orange is flu, blue is covid. As you can see covid replaced flu deaths if you look to the year 2020/2021.
This could be attributed to lockdowns, washing hands, etc. But probably a similar percentage of people are still vulnerable and could die from getting a respiratory disease.
If true it's pretty harsh actually, if we would have washed our hands and would take more care in 2017 we possibly could have saved these lives.
Percentage of all deaths due to pneumonia, influenza, and COVID-19, National Summary, 18 years.png
Source: https://gis.cdc.gov/grasp/fluview/mortality.html

Sure they do. But just propaganda isn't enough. Maybe we need to build a society that doesn't tell to each memeber he should be the best, so that we fix the cause of the stress, or that allows people to survive working fewer hours so they can get sleep, or that doesn't fool them into consumism that gets them working more and sleeping less. Etc. Some people don't know or don't care about healthy lifestyles and may benefit from the propaganda. But some know and don't feel they can do much about it.
I don't have the answer for what could work for getting healthier. Sometimes good proposals have the opposite outcome. If the government arranges everything so people stay mostly healthy, by putting restrictions or taxes on 'unhealthy' foods for example, people might not even be aware they need to pay attention to their health. In Japan for example it's normal to publicly shame people that are 'to fat' and have them pay more for their health insurance (I think being overweight is even against the law), which mostly works, but isn't an acceptable solution by most cultures.
 
Last edited:

TeDaDeS

Hardcore Member
Joined
Jan 15, 2004
Messages
1,379
Location
The Netherlands
Website
Visit site
Very funny. Japan is consumer society.
"The New York Times reported in 2008 the Metabo Law affects men with waistlines larger than 35.4 inches and women with waistlines larger than 31.5 inches. People exceeding these governmental limits, which are identical to the measurements established by the International Diabetes Federation in 2006, may be required to go to counseling sessions or converse with a health expert about dietary options. Unlike individuals, however, companies and local governments can be assessed financial penalties if the citizens in their charge do not meet government standards"
 
  • Wow
Reactions: rSl

netcat

Very Active Member
Joined
May 3, 2016
Messages
672
Location
city of thieves
"The New York Times reported in 2008 the Metabo Law affects men with waistlines larger than 35.4 inches and women with waistlines larger than 31.5 inches. People exceeding these governmental limits, which are identical to the measurements established by the International Diabetes Federation in 2006, may be required to go to counseling sessions or converse with a health expert about dietary options. Unlike individuals, however, companies and local governments can be assessed financial penalties if the citizens in their charge do not meet government standards"
what about sumo's?
 

TeDaDeS

Hardcore Member
Joined
Jan 15, 2004
Messages
1,379
Location
The Netherlands
Website
Visit site
what about sumo's?
I don't know the details of this law. Obviously it's not illegal to be a large person in Japan, it's actively being motivated to not become overweight.
And even the problem of obesity in Japan is small already. But still, these kind of government rules wouldn't work in all other countries.

Sumo wrestlers also don't usually run into the same health issues as obese people:
"CT scans reveal that sumo wrestlers don't have much visceral fat at all. Instead, they store most of their fat right underneath the skin. That's why scientists think sumo wrestlers are healthy. They have normal levels of triglycerides, a type of fat in their blood, and unexpectedly low levels of cholesterol, both of which lower their risk of heart disease, heart attack, and stroke."
Source: https://www.businessinsider.nl/sumo...they store most of,, heart attack, and stroke

I guess there are probably provisions that provide exemptions.
Sumo wrestlers don't always get healthcare benefits by the stable they work in. Which is a real problem for the younger players as they don't get paid a lot.
Also there aren't that many wrestlers btw (about 650 active ones?): https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_active_sumo_wrestlers

btw. There is also a SUMO (small ubiquitin-like modifier) related to covid: https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/33769223/
 

FBnil

I promise to cut my personal CO2 emissions by 2060
Joined
Dec 14, 2012
Messages
4,560
Location
Yurp
If you know your batch info, you can check here if that batch was particularly contaminated, or has deviations in adverse reactions:


We welcome our new viral mutation: B.1.640.2
 

JDTAY

Half Pepperoni, All Cheese
Joined
Sep 15, 2015
Messages
2,637
Age
34
Location
North Carolina, USA
I went to Walgreen's to get a rapid COVID test, but they were all out, so I spent all my money on Apple credit instead. Am I a bad person?

BTW, if B.1.640.2 were important, wouldn't it be everywhere by now?
 

JDTAY

Half Pepperoni, All Cheese
Joined
Sep 15, 2015
Messages
2,637
Age
34
Location
North Carolina, USA
At least I know I still have my sense of taste, because I've been having what they call "sulfa burps". Omicron, hurry up and relieve me of this.
 

levi

Still fresh, damnit!
Joined
Oct 6, 2008
Messages
15,215
Location
Somewhere off the coast of the EU
If you know your batch info, you can check here if that batch was particularly contaminated, or has deviations in adverse reactions:
How would doses of vaccine become contaminated? I'd imagine it's quite easy for them to go off, if part of the supply chain doesn't have sufficient cooling perhaps, but given they come in sealed vials I can't easily imagine how they've become contaminated.
 

TeDaDeS

Hardcore Member
Joined
Jan 15, 2004
Messages
1,379
Location
The Netherlands
Website
Visit site
How would doses of vaccine become contaminated? I'd imagine it's quite easy for them to go off, if part of the supply chain doesn't have sufficient cooling perhaps, but given they come in sealed vials I can't easily imagine how they've become contaminated.
I guess during production itself. They sometimes also find out afterwards when a batch is received and inspected by a local government.
 

pyrat

Well-Known Member
Joined
May 20, 2016
Messages
797
At least I know I still have my sense of taste, because I've been having what they call "sulfa burps". Omicron, hurry up and relieve me of this.
Not an expert, but I think you need to ask that to Delta (or others). I think Omicron does not have as a sympton loss of taste. Ins't that in bad taste for the virus? Maybe I'm mistaken?
 

FBnil

I promise to cut my personal CO2 emissions by 2060
Joined
Dec 14, 2012
Messages
4,560
Location
Yurp
BTW, if B.1.640.2 were important, wouldn't it be everywhere by now?

Everywhere, as in the wild? or as in the News? Or as geo-politically?
How would doses of vaccine become contaminated?
As the pressure is high to produce (because it brings in millions), the quality check parameters are changed so that many batches that would be not-good-enough-for-the-west-ship-to-2nd-world-countries are approved and shipped. Mass-production does that.

(note: not an official website)
 

TeDaDeS

Hardcore Member
Joined
Jan 15, 2004
Messages
1,379
Location
The Netherlands
Website
Visit site
Example of small things that are missing nuance:
If you look to the CDC covid death counter, there is no explanation about how to read this information: https://covid.cdc.gov/covid-data-tracker/#cases_casesper100klast7days
It's just: these people tested positive for covid and died.
When you look at the same data for vaccine deaths: https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/vaccines/safety/adverse-events.html
You get a clear warning: "Reports of adverse events to VAERS following vaccination, including deaths, do not necessarily mean that a vaccine caused a health problem.".
While that statement is completely true, why wouldn't you always want to make clear how to interpret the presented data. I see it's only done for the vaccine data, while you would like to have accurate data for covid deaths also (I mean, these are thrown around in the news without any nuance, the higher the better). I bet the covid counter is way less accurate, but we really don't care as it's into the millions anyway. But you could at least be consistent and state that this data probably isn't accurate with the notion that it doesn't change the fact that covid probably caused most of them. I mean people use to die also, we can probably check all the expected deaths and see if other usual reasons of death are much lower now.
A video talking about the possible over-estimation of death rate of the initial covid out break (claim: rate was more 0.3% then 3.0% due to untested asymptomatic people):

Note: this video isn't about less cases of death, it's that probably a lot more people got covid without knowing, which would lower the rate of death per covid patient.
 

TeDaDeS

Hardcore Member
Joined
Jan 15, 2004
Messages
1,379
Location
The Netherlands
Website
Visit site
Surely asymptomatic people don't die, except from sudden death.
Correct.

The claim would be:
What was reported: From 100 sick people 3 die = 3.0% death rate.
What might have happened: From 1000 sick people 3 die = 0.3%, which is much lower due to having much more asymptomatic people. These people didn't know, or thought they had something else, and weren't tested at that time.
Obviously the asymptomatic people didn't die, or weren't counted as covid deaths if they did.
 

netcat

Very Active Member
Joined
May 3, 2016
Messages
672
Location
city of thieves
sudden death.
@JDTAY - got that?
FUD. Thanks levi.

I have a question for those of you who have children: Do your schools "teach" about vaccines?

My daughters school has a new interim headmaster who just outlined all the covid protocols about testing, masks, isolation. I felt the need to contact him to confirm there would be no vaccine indoctrination. Haven't heard back. Hope she's not expelled.

If there's any push-back I'm going to play my religious grounds card.
 
Last edited:

FBnil

I promise to cut my personal CO2 emissions by 2060
Joined
Dec 14, 2012
Messages
4,560
Location
Yurp
Top