QuickShot/QuickJoy-type Joystick

Discussion in 'Offtopic Discussions' started by Morn, Jan 9, 2019.

  1. Morn

    Morn Member

    Joined:
    May 13, 2010
    Messages:
    292
    I'm looking for a replacement for my over 25 year old DB-9 Joysticks for Commodore. The thing is, over the years I got used to fighter-jet- inspired controllers. I mean:
    - reasonably ergonomic handle
    - trigger-like fire button under index finger
    Nice to have features: autofire, additional button on the base or under the thumb. In the 80 and 90 there were companies like QuickShot with plenty models to choose from, but now it seems times changed. This is what I found so far: There are new Atari/Commodore compatible joysticks being produced, available even in EvelDragon's shop! The thing is, they are based either on classic Atari CX series (I know, I't pure retro, but honestly far away from being ergonomic) or with arcade ball-on-top controllers (competition pro). These certainly have fans, but I'm not one of them. I mean I can play with them, but they are not comfortable.
    There's also this Polish Matt company which sells new old stock (and possibly some new batches using old molds). There are two types:
    1. Skorpion - this would be exactly what I'm looking for. Unfortunately I did some research and found out that Skorpions are cool looking but not that well engineered and wear of quickly, become wobbly etc.
    2. AFF - there's no index-finger trigger, but I've heard they are pretty sturdy so I might eventually go with one.
    Some time ago I bought fancy USB->DB9 mouse adapter, mostly for playing Lemmings with modern optical mouse. It also works with joysticks (both analog and digital). I tried with a cheap unbranded USB joystick. It's working OK, however with being analogue there's no clear evidence when the stick triggers movement: no click, no physical resistance. It's hard to make precise movements like in platformers. I was also looking for analogue USB joysticks, but ended up with the same problem as before - the only one I found were designed like to imitate arcade sticks.
     
    Tags:
  2. levi

    levi Still fresh, damnit!

    Joined:
    Oct 6, 2008
    Messages:
    11,099
    Location:
    Somewhere off the coast of the EU
    What's wrong with your old joysticks? Miniature micro-switches are still commonly available for replacement, and auto-fire is just a square wave oscillator probably built from a 555 timer, but it strikes me as unlikely that that has broken on your old joysticks. Perhaps the plastics have broken, but the magic of 3d printing, sugru or good old fashioned woodworking could fill the gaps there.
     
  3. PCXT

    PCXT Very Active Member

    Joined:
    Sep 14, 2016
    Messages:
    223
    For a solid device, what I recommend is to look for (even slightly used) microswitch-based joystick. I recently got one and I will show it in my site, it's quite solid thing. It uses true microswitches (modern parts sold as microswitches are rather "tact switches") like these used in domestic appliances.

    If something with contacts failed:
    1. Broken small springs/hinged contacts: Do not loose contacts, replace springs. Springs from broken tape decks/streamers cut to dimension are OK. If you lost hinged contacts, the only way is to sit a "tact switch" in there, solder with wires. Do not solder to metal parts of contact as this will make it hard to repair when you find hinged metal part and spring.
    2. Broken larger, +-shaped sheet of metal, this one with hole in the center. I found that it is possible to make replacements of old razor blades cut to dimension. Warning: Experience in sheet metal cutting needed. Then you need to "tune" even angle by bending it a bit.
    3. Problem with microswitches - these are one of the best joysticks available, but they're loud. Microswitches available in shops with parts for domestic appliances.
    4. Carbon domes - repair as TV remotes, with repair kits.
    5. Metal domes. Until you lost one, if mechanically damaged use a head of a round-head screw to straighten it on a piece of wood. If track is damaged -> conductive paint.
     
    levi likes this.
  4. Morn

    Morn Member

    Joined:
    May 13, 2010
    Messages:
    292
    Well, one of them has problem with the trigger button. Whole button is physically skewed to the side so it could be a broken part or at least something snapped out of it's usual place. I think In the end I will have to take it apart, the thing is, it's at least partially working (if you push the button at right angle.I'm not sure If I will be able to fix it or event assemble it back in it's current state. I don't have a soldering iron, let alone a 3d printer or carpenter tools. If I had a replacement I'd be more eager to experiment with old ones.
    The other one has no single defect. It's just really feels worn-out: it's squeaky, doesn't not always react to movement o requires extra force to kick-in. This one doesn't click, so it might be those rubber domes.
     
  5. levi

    levi Still fresh, damnit!

    Joined:
    Oct 6, 2008
    Messages:
    11,099
    Location:
    Somewhere off the coast of the EU
    It's always worth taking things apart. If you're not confident about being able to reassemble the thing, take notes as you go, or perhaps even better these days, take pictures at each stage so you can see how everything fits together. In my experience of anything cheap like this made in the 1980s/early 90s will be pretty simple to take apart and put together again.
     
  6. spud42

    spud42 Very Active Member

    Joined:
    Aug 22, 2009
    Messages:
    591
    Location:
    Brisbane,Australia.
    bonus with photos is if you post them here maybe someone could suggest a way to repair it..
     
    levi likes this.

Share This Page

Loading...