On the cromulency of pedancy and other questions of English languacy, a quest for our common joy and enlightenment.


Djoga'Ro

moonstruck
Joined
Apr 3, 2016
Messages
2,133
Seeing the resemblance to German Schuld I thought it suggested that that's wider spread in germanic languages and English probably had its own variant, before the English wanted to be more like French kings. And lo and behold:
 
Last edited:

FBnil

I promise to cut my personal CO2 emissions by 2060
Joined
Dec 14, 2012
Messages
4,560
Location
Yurp

Probably nothing to do with skulls, more likely from the Scots word sculduddery/sculduderi ( https://www.dsl.ac.uk/entry/snd/sculduddery ) with scul/sculd possibly coming from the Norse word relating to guilt.
So basically Merriam-Webster is lying? Oh! Cruel shitfuckery!
 

pyrat

Well-Known Member
Joined
May 20, 2016
Messages
797
Seeing the resemblance to German Schuld I thaught it suggested that that's wider spread in germanic languages and English probably had its own variant, before the English wanted to be more like French kings. And lo and behold:
Mmmh. So there's a word that means both child (like son or daughter) and Debt, fault, guilt. They say it's not etimologically related, though, just coincidence.
 

FBnil

I promise to cut my personal CO2 emissions by 2060
Joined
Dec 14, 2012
Messages
4,560
Location
Yurp
I learned a new word today: chromostereopsis

Chromo stereo opsis = color stereo likeness.

property of our vision system where cones reacting to red colour are around 64% of all cones and reacting on blue are 2 percent and each of them has different focal point.

This being a handheld/software site, here is the source (not mine, of course, my code would never compile, or crash and make your machine catch fire)
 
Last edited:

FBnil

I promise to cut my personal CO2 emissions by 2060
Joined
Dec 14, 2012
Messages
4,560
Location
Yurp

 

Phlyra

FLOSSing
Joined
Jul 25, 2019
Messages
1,517

Many fewer words? Don’t they mean: far fewer words?
 

Djoga'Ro

moonstruck
Joined
Apr 3, 2016
Messages
2,133
Question for native English speakers:
Say, in the context of trailing some sensor carrier at sea I'd provide you with an UI to check on/controll that carrier. If I'd label a value like "150 m" with "veer", what would you make of it?
 

Phlyra

FLOSSing
Joined
Jul 25, 2019
Messages
1,517
Well since it’s this thread, first I’d start with:
Say, in the context of trailing some sensor carrier at sea I'd provide you with an UI to check on/controll that carrier. If I'd labelled a value like "150 m" with "veer", what would you make of it?
And then I’d go:
If I labelled a value like "150 m" with "veer"
WTF is “veer” in this context?! Does the ship’s captain need to veer off course simply because they see “150m”? Or is this “veer” more like “four” in German? In which case, how does four = 150?
 

Confuzzled

Very Active Member
Joined
Oct 1, 2018
Messages
162
Question for native English speakers:
Say, in the context of trailing some sensor carrier at sea I'd provide you with an UI to check on/controll that carrier. If I'd label a value like "150 m" with "veer", what would you make of it?
I would wonder what you meant.

Most people who do not have a particular metorological background (including the knowledge necessary for operating ships and boats at sea) would regard veer as meaning a type of turn or change of direction, and no more than that. People who need to listen to the Shipping Forecast put particular meaning on the words 'veering' and 'backing'. Using the Wiktionary definition, veering:"(intransitive, of the wind) To shift in a clockwise direction (if in the Northern Hemisphere, or in a counterclockwise direction if in the Southern Hemisphere)." The language used in Shipping Forecasts is carefully controlled to have standard meanings, and the glossary is here: UK Meteorological Office: Marine Forecasts glossary:

Veering​


The changing of the wind direction clockwise, e.g. SW to W

If you are trying to indicate that the towed sensor is off-axis with respect to the imaginary line extended backwards by the keel of the ship, I would say off-axis by <n> metres to port or off-axis by <n>metres to starboard.
 

Djoga'Ro

moonstruck
Joined
Apr 3, 2016
Messages
2,133
I guess, I have my answer. I would have meant by that, that there's 150 m of towing line given off of the drum. I'd have prefered that term for its similarity to the German verb fieren, which means to give towing line. This made me think it was viable: (And yes, just now I recognized the noun has nothing to do with the Dutch-y etymology and that it says instance there, not distance - me being tired, I guess)
Still, sure I was not.

What would be a better choice? (Every correct one. I know.) I don't like slackened for a towing line, but maybe my perception of that word's meaning is too narrow. I also wouldn't like to spend too much real estate on that label.
My pick now would be "line given". Or "umb. out"? :) (as in umbilical)
 

Confuzzled

Very Active Member
Joined
Oct 1, 2018
Messages
162
I guess, I have my answer. I would have meant by that, that there's 150 m of towing line given off of the drum. I'd have prefered that term for its similarity to the German verb fieren, which means to give towing line. This made me think it was viable: (And yes, just now I recognized the noun has nothing to do with the Dutch-y etymology and that it says instance there, not distance - me being tired, I guess)
Still, sure I was not.

What would be a better choice? (Every correct one. I know.) I don't like slackened for a towing line, but maybe my perception of that word's meaning is too narrow. I also wouldn't like to spend too much real estate on that label.
My pick now would be "line given". Or "umb. out"? :) (as in umbilical)
I think the correct term would be 'paid out' https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/pay_out

See also for examples of the use of pay out/paid out:

Wikipedia: Glossary of Nautical Terms: knot https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Glossary_of_nautical_terms#knot

Wikipedia: Knot (Unit): Origin https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Knot_(unit)#Origin

Wikipedia: Glossary of Nautical Terms: bitter end https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Glossary_of_nautical_terms#bitter_end

for examples of the use of pay out/paid out
 

Phlyra

FLOSSing
Joined
Jul 25, 2019
Messages
1,517
I guess, I have my answer. I would have meant by that, that there's 150 m of towing line given off of the drum. I'd have prefered that term for its similarity to the German verb fieren, which means to give towing line. This made me think it was viable: (And yes, just now I recognized the noun has nothing to do with the Dutch-y etymology and that it says instance there, not distance - me being tired, I guess)
Still, sure I was not.

What would be a better choice? (Every correct one. I know.) I don't like slackened for a towing line, but maybe my perception of that word's meaning is too narrow. I also wouldn't like to spend too much real estate on that label.
My pick now would be "line given". Or "umb. out"? :) (as in umbilical)
I’m curious, what’s the project?
 

Djoga'Ro

moonstruck
Joined
Apr 3, 2016
Messages
2,133
A trailed device to watch fish from behind the net (for research, more selective fishing), if I got that right. It can actively rise and dive, can sense its distance to the bottom (at an angle) and has a camera up front.
I'm to write the operator's controls to watch some fun values and the cam feed and set a max diving depth and give a setpoint for ground clearance. After it took me three quarters of the year to establish a bare minimum library that let's me communicate with ROS2 nodes - without me employing the ROS2 framework, but "just" FastDDS -, I need to speed things up. So I write a rather static application just for this device. After that, I want to do a generic one. So that for future devices only a custom configuration needs to be made.
 

Phlyra

FLOSSing
Joined
Jul 25, 2019
Messages
1,517
A trailed device to watch fish from behind the net (for research, more selective fishing), if I got that right. It can actively rise and dive, can sense its distance to the bottom (at an angle) and has a camera up front.
I'm to write the operator's controls to watch some fun values and the cam feed and set a max diving depth and give a setpoint for ground clearance. After it took me three quarters of the year to establish a bare minimum library that let's me communicate with ROS2 nodes - without me employing the ROS2 framework, but "just" FastDDS -, I need to speed things up. So I write a rather static application just for this device. After that, I want to do a generic one. So that for future devices only a custom configuration needs to be made.
Neat! Is that in conjunction with Hampiðjan?
 

Djoga'Ro

moonstruck
Joined
Apr 3, 2016
Messages
2,133
Never heard that name til now. The customer is an institute belonging to some German ministry.
 

FBnil

I promise to cut my personal CO2 emissions by 2060
Joined
Dec 14, 2012
Messages
4,560
Location
Yurp
Hello fellow Linguists. I have a Quest, should you choose to participate in it.
The answer is at the end, hidden.
Before you start, write down your start time so you can track how many minutes (seconds?) you took with your google-fu (or duckduck-fu, or bing-fu, or altavista-fu, or etc...)
I'm searching for a book. the book has one phrase that is used all over: "Don't thank me, thank uni."
The author is a man. The protagonist's nickname is Chip.

Here's an introduction, first about the Author, then a brief explanation of the book (with huge spoilers but does not give away everything, and it's insightful):

Here you get read part of the book, just to entice you reading it (and it contains less spoilers than the previous video):

The book has an audiobook on the net.
I find the quality as good as, or even better, than other novels than, say 1984 in story building. Although not with it's flaws.
It's oh so similar to: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brave_New_World
Which in my eyes is a better depiction of the future.
Good read if you like these type of stories.



And to stay somewhat on topic: Is it cromulent to say "thank you in advance", just to save one empty email/msg thanking afterwards.
 

TeDaDeS

Hardcore Member
Joined
Jan 15, 2004
Messages
1,379
Location
The Netherlands
Website
Visit site
Hello fellow Linguists. I have a Quest, should you choose to participate in it.
The answer is at the end, hidden.
Before you start, write down your start time so you can track how many minutes (seconds?) you took with your google-fu (or duckduck-fu, or bing-fu, or altavista-fu, or etc...)
I'm searching for a book. the book has one phrase that is used all over: "Don't thank me, thank uni."
The author is a man. The protagonist's nickname is Chip.
It was my first hit on google when searching for it. Probably it's because you summarized all the important keywords.
 
Top