Hi, Gene!

Discussion in 'Offtopic Discussions' started by theredbaron, Aug 29, 2019.

  1. Djoga'Ro

    Djoga'Ro moonstruck

    Joined:
    Apr 3, 2016
    Messages:
    892
    @levi "I don't believe, what you say" is already a way to say "I don't believe, what you say". ? It's synonym to "You haven't convinced me (yet)". A statement like this isn't that significant. You might call it selfe-evident, since it comes from the best informed source thinkable and the source is unlikely to err on that point - might lie, but that's hard to determine and isn't very important to the argument.

    "What you described, is impossible" is another beast entirely - wouldn't you say? ;)
     
  2. Swordfish II

    Swordfish II Very Active Member

    Joined:
    May 20, 2015
    Messages:
    798
    I provided a peer reviewed study about flouride being good for your bones and teeth.

    The other dude told his crazy views that people are simply dumping grounds for toxic waste and it's not good for bones and teeth...

    Hmmm but you know what. I'll humor you as well.

    https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/cavities/symptoms-causes/syc-20352892

    Acid is not a factor. GERD or burping up stomach acid can damage teeth..but AT NO POINT IS YOUR SALIVA ACID AND THE CAUSE OF CAVETIES.

    You also can't make your salvia alkaline.

    This isn't the first time his ridiculous views have been proven wrong.

    And yes the well respected Mayo clinic is a little more trustworthy than carefreedental.com especially by someone that believes we should all be frugivores and ignored that you will literally die if all you eat is fruit
     
    Last edited: Sep 7, 2019
    ___ likes this.
  3. Djoga'Ro

    Djoga'Ro moonstruck

    Joined:
    Apr 3, 2016
    Messages:
    892
    @Swordfish II You did. And I must admit, I didn't looked at the source you provided. But since you actually claimed not a single thing lambda said was possible, and I'm somewhat sure about one or two things (s)he said to be true and thus also presuming your source wouldn't show every said thing to be impossible (which is a very strong claim), I thought your claim under-backed. I mean one thing you claimed by that was, that it's impossible for teeth to get erroded by acids. o_O I dare you to test that - with your teeth that is. ;)
     
    ClockworkCoder likes this.
  4. Swordfish II

    Swordfish II Very Active Member

    Joined:
    May 20, 2015
    Messages:
    798
    They can be. Carbonation can do it. Gerd (stomach acid being burped up) can do it.

    Neither cause cavities.

    "acid saliva" is not a thing and doesn't cause cavities.

    I edited my post to include the mayo clinic on what ACTUALLY causes cavities

    So no it's not possible in any fashion to have "acid saliva that causes cavities"
     
    ___ likes this.
  5. Lambda

    Lambda Very Active Member

    Joined:
    Sep 13, 2016
    Messages:
    101
    I never said anything that contradicts this. Are you arguing against me or against yourself?

    I quote, from the page that you yourself linked to:
    Even your own linked resource mentions acid causing tooth decay.
    Here is another quote from your own linked page:
    This is what I was referring to. Your linked page proves my point. So I then we agree that acid causes tooth decay?
     
    FBnil and Djoga'Ro like this.
  6. levi

    levi Still fresh, damnit!

    Joined:
    Oct 6, 2008
    Messages:
    11,231
    Location:
    Somewhere off the coast of the EU
    Yes, because it has no expression of doubt, it's simply a claim to the gods. Add "I don't think" to either the front or the end and you get a very similar beast to the 'I don't believe what you say', although it perhaps deserves qualification with some sources because it also tries to express a position rather than merely doubt.

    As for how much it's just noise versus having value, it rather depends on who was saying it, I suspect. I dunno, I tend to leave extraordinary claims to their own devices myself, but maybe it's better if someone whose opinions I tend to trust to a degree at least pops up and at least says 'I call your bluff; prove it'. Otherwise my inaction could be misinterpreted as me saying I don't have a problem with what was claimed.
     
    Djoga'Ro likes this.
  7. Lambda

    Lambda Very Active Member

    Joined:
    Sep 13, 2016
    Messages:
    101
    Against who are you arguing? Where did I say anything about acid saliva causing cavities? I never said that saliva causes cavities. Saliva can prevent cavities, but does not cause them.
     
    levi likes this.
  8. Swordfish II

    Swordfish II Very Active Member

    Joined:
    May 20, 2015
    Messages:
    798
    Tooth decay is not a cavity

    At no point did it say "saliva can neutralize acid"
    --- Double Post Merged, Sep 7, 2019, Original Post Date: Sep 7, 2019 ---
    Saliva in no way prevents cavities. As proven by both sources i posted.
     
  9. Djoga'Ro

    Djoga'Ro moonstruck

    Joined:
    Apr 3, 2016
    Messages:
    892
    @Swordfish II By "after claiming sth.'s not possible, saying it(*)'s also not accurate and not backed up by anything, is just making noise." I merely meant the first point already implies the following two - at least in my understanding.
    (*) or rather the statement about it

    Chemical corrosion leads to cavities, of course. Or, what else do you mean by decay? And yes, as Lambda cited your source, feed bacteria sugar and they produce a lot of acid.

    I'm not entirely sold on the possibility of getting your saliva alcaic alkaline, either. Though I also heard my mother preach about us westerners being too acidic nowadays due to consumtion habits - which could explain, why that study couldn't recognize saliva's claimed ability to help prevent cavities. But I don't know what to think of this acidic/alcaic alkaline aspect. On the one hand my mother is an internist with nearly five decades under her belt, on the other hand she ventures into alternative fields and sometimes relays the most outlandish claims. Bio-photons, anyone. :) And, I don't know, where she picked up the acid talk - or where did Lambda for that matter. @Lambda ?
     
    Last edited: Sep 7, 2019
  10. levi

    levi Still fresh, damnit!

    Joined:
    Oct 6, 2008
    Messages:
    11,231
    Location:
    Somewhere off the coast of the EU
    What's this word, 'alcaic'? Apparently it's used in reference to the lyric verse of this feller, but I've no idea what relevance that has to our teeth or our saliva. Do you perhaps mean alkaline?
     
    Djoga'Ro likes this.
  11. Djoga'Ro

    Djoga'Ro moonstruck

    Joined:
    Apr 3, 2016
    Messages:
    892
    Yes I do. Thanks. I wrongly guesstimated the translation. In hindsight, my guess doesn't even seem very educated.
     
    levi likes this.
  12. Lambda

    Lambda Very Active Member

    Joined:
    Sep 13, 2016
    Messages:
    101
    To quote your linked page:

    One of the sources that you referred to actually says:
    (The underline was added by me.)
    --- Double Post Merged, Sep 8, 2019 ---
    I am not sure where I first learned of this, but many sources talk about saliva neutralising acid in the mouth. Swordfish II linked to one of them, which I quoted above. Others can easily be found online. It seems to be pretty well-known knowledge, even beyond the field of natural medicine.
     
  13. FBnil

    FBnil Ready to Champion the Pyra to the World...

    Joined:
    Dec 14, 2012
    Messages:
    2,771
    Location:
    Yurp
    This does even apply to xenomorphs (they baddies from the "Aliens" movie). They have white teeth and lots of saliva.
    Now, their blood is very acidic, and can even corrode metal in seconds. So what if a xenomorph bit his gum or lip... do their teeth suffer?

    Just pointing out that the C64 SID chip has sawtooth AND decay (as part of the ADSR envelope)
    If you look at the yellow arrows, they show a cavity. Where "cavity" has been defined as:
    cavity - space that is surrounded by something. enclosed space. space - an empty area (usually bounded in some way between things); "the architect left space in front of the building"; "they stopped at an open space in the jungle"; "the space between his teeth".
    sawtooth decay.jpg

    Considering the C64 has sweet music, I also expect it to have many cavities. (indeed, all waveforms have them!)

    When I do that, the bacteria in my mouth die. So the next day, even without having brushed my teeth, I do not have bad breath (well, except for the acid).
    Ever put an egg (eggshell has calcium) in acid (vinegar)? It gets soft.
     
    Last edited: Sep 8, 2019
    ClockworkCoder likes this.

Share This Page

Loading...