Hi, Gene!

Discussion in 'Offtopic Discussions' started by theredbaron, Aug 29, 2019.

  1. theredbaron

    theredbaron Member

    Joined:
    Feb 12, 2014
    Messages:
    39
    Location:
    /home/theredbaron/
    I was more there are some things I wish I didn't have to smell. Driving past the dump, no smelling now. Toilet backed up, yeah, no. Someone farted? Yeah, I am just not even tempting fate.


    Didn't even think about playing dead, but yeah, good idea too.
     
    Last edited: Aug 30, 2019
    Tags:
  2. MrMelty

    MrMelty Hot stuff

    Joined:
    Sep 17, 2016
    Messages:
    57
    Is it just me, or does something smell burnt?
     
    rSl likes this.
  3. Grench

    Grench Forum Addict!

    Joined:
    Oct 3, 2008
    Messages:
    6,139
    Any of which are far more pleasant than the wretched stench people seem obsessed with using to "cover up" those relatively naturally occurring smells. Advertisers somehow convinced billions of people that when they smell unpleasant chemicals in the air that they should spray more unpleasant, and in many cases more dangerous, chemicals into the air.
     
    HelenF, FBnil, levi and 1 other person like this.
  4. Lambda

    Lambda Very Active Member

    Joined:
    Sep 13, 2016
    Messages:
    101
    I agree, I cannot stand chemical sprays meant to cover up stench. Back when I lost my foul body odour, soap and deodorant were the first things that I stopped using. I also find it unhygienic that people accept deodorant as a substitute to good hygiene. If you have a foul odour then you are unhygienic and should clean yourself, not add even more filth to your body to cover up the stench of the original filth.
     
  5. theredbaron

    theredbaron Member

    Joined:
    Feb 12, 2014
    Messages:
    39
    Location:
    /home/theredbaron/
    Agreed, in general.
     
  6. levi

    levi Still fresh, damnit!

    Joined:
    Oct 6, 2008
    Messages:
    11,231
    Location:
    Somewhere off the coast of the EU
    What do you clean yourself with if you don't use soap? Clear water, especially flowing can remove extraneous material, but grease and anything dissolved in your skin fats will remain. Or do you use detergents instead of soap? I'm found unscented soaps much easier to find than unscented detergents personally.

    I also found detergents lead to the skin on my knuckles cracking in the wintertime, so I switched to using unscented soaps.
     
    Swordfish II likes this.
  7. Djoga'Ro

    Djoga'Ro moonstruck

    Joined:
    Apr 3, 2016
    Messages:
    892
    Well, I'm curious about the soapstitute, too.
     
  8. TeDaDeS

    TeDaDeS Very Active Member

    Joined:
    Jan 15, 2004
    Messages:
    883
    Location:
    The Netherlands
    I probably missed something, have to see where it switched from Pyra to this topic :p

    I did have a smelly laptop once. Smelled like cat pee. But it appeared to be some chemical they put into the plastic.
    Didn't do any smell test on Pyra's new case, but we should. Cat pee smelling Pyra's wouldn't be a good thing.
     
    Djoga'Ro likes this.
  9. Hồng Thất Công

    Hồng Thất Công Đả Cẩu Bổng Pháp

    Joined:
    Dec 19, 2012
    Messages:
    4,380
    Location:
    Cái Bang
    This thread has turned into a Soap Opyra.
     
    levi, cube48, FBnil and 8 others like this.
  10. Lambda

    Lambda Very Active Member

    Joined:
    Sep 13, 2016
    Messages:
    101
    I clean myself with nature.
     
  11. Beard Lost in the Woods

    Beard Lost in the Woods Still Fresh

    Joined:
    May 25, 2018
    Messages:
    11
    Location:
    France
    Believe it or not, sweat and grease are washed away just fine with water+rubbing a bit. Soap is a modern addition to human hygiene and is really useful for heavy grime and lowering sickness risks on exposed body parts (hands, ass, probably face).
    Spoiler: water+rubbing a bit can't be used as a hair care substitute.
     
    levi likes this.
  12. MTPDA

    MTPDA Still Fresh

    Joined:
    Oct 31, 2018
    Messages:
    22
    Location:
    Waterloo, Canada
    Modern liquid soap is recent but according to multiple sources soap has been around since at least 2800 b.c. a quick Google search returns
    Sources:
    https://www.open.edu/openlearn/hist...dicine/history-science/the-history-soapmaking
    This source claims soap was used by ancient Sumerian priests and temple attendants ~3000 bc to clean wool and in the absence of soap they used ashes and water.
    https://www.cleaninginstitute.org/understanding-products/why-clean/soaps-detergents-history
    This source claims that the ancient Babylonians used it in 2800 bc and the ancient Egyptians used it regularly for bathing in 1500 bc and that it wasn't intil 487 ad that bathing habits started to decline in the middle ages.
    http://www.soaphistory.net/
    Finally this source (Google's source) claims the Babylonians were the first to make soap in 2800 bc. It also points out soap was used medicinally for at least 5000 years.
     
    ___, pimaster and levi like this.
  13. ClockworkCoder

    ClockworkCoder Chaotic Neutral

    Joined:
    Jan 21, 2016
    Messages:
    1,097
    Location:
    Menzoberranzan
    I've had it. I'm washing my hands of this thread.
     
    FBnil, spud42, Neelix and 4 others like this.
  14. Grench

    Grench Forum Addict!

    Joined:
    Oct 3, 2008
    Messages:
    6,139
    I have brushed my teeth before using wood ash from a campfire - tastes terrible, but it works.
    Smoke from a campfire can kill bacteria growing in your clothes - you'll smell like campfire instead.
    I wonder if gathering around a campfire may have had a social-evolutionary effect on us.
    --- Double Post Merged, Sep 5, 2019, Original Post Date: Sep 5, 2019 ---
    At least this is dissolving into a nice clean thread. Not like there are any zombies here.

    Anxiously awaiting a fresh new news post.
     
  15. ClockworkCoder

    ClockworkCoder Chaotic Neutral

    Joined:
    Jan 21, 2016
    Messages:
    1,097
    Location:
    Menzoberranzan
    @Grench, there ain't nothing wrong with zombies ;)

    Or zmobies, as I like to call them. (KoL)
     
    theredbaron likes this.
  16. Lambda

    Lambda Very Active Member

    Joined:
    Sep 13, 2016
    Messages:
    101
    Proper hygiene is more than just washing the body's outside. The skin is the largest elimination organ in the human body. Keep the inside clean and the outside will follow.
     
    FBnil likes this.
  17. WizardStan

    WizardStan Mega GP Mania

    Joined:
    May 24, 2008
    Messages:
    16,713
    Talked to a dentist about toothpastes once and, as long as you're going regularly to get your flouride rinse, he said you only really need to disrupt the plaque buildup at the gum line: just a good scrubbing with anything abrasive'll do, and your teeth'll be just fine. Not great, but fine.
     
  18. Djoga'Ro

    Djoga'Ro moonstruck

    Joined:
    Apr 3, 2016
    Messages:
    892
    My mother think's it great to brush the teeth with salt. Don't know, if she always uses salt, though.
     
  19. Beard Lost in the Woods

    Beard Lost in the Woods Still Fresh

    Joined:
    May 25, 2018
    Messages:
    11
    Location:
    France
    it has been around, yes, but was not widely used for body care. I thought it's use dated from 200 years ago but wasn't so sure about it, and way too lazy to check. Had you not dug some sources up on the subject, I wouldn't have bothered.

    soaphistory states it as follow :

    Raw? You didn't make a glass of wood ash lye? It would probably have still tasted terrible, though.

    [​IMG]
     
  20. Lambda

    Lambda Very Active Member

    Joined:
    Sep 13, 2016
    Messages:
    101
    Fluoride is literally toxic waste and it makes the teeth and bones brittle (in addition to other damage to the body). Dentists get taught to use it because it creates a good market to get rid of the abundance of fluoride. It makes marketing sense, because they can use people their bodies as toxic waste dump (most people use their bodies as toxic waste dump anyway) and they get paid for it as well. In America they really do this in a smart way because they just dump it in the drinking water and say it is medicine for people's teeth. I love to get my medicine in random doses completely independent of my size and other physical factors. That is how everyone does medicine, right?

    I stopped with fluoride long ago. It is better to just make sure that the body does not get too acid because acid is what really damages the teeth. With an alkaline body your saliva will help neutralise the acid. And of course to brush the teeth without fluoride.

    Either way to bring this back on topic: How well does the Pyra resists fluoride? Is it fluoride proof to a depth of 2 meters? If I ever go to an American water facility then I would like to use my Pyra to take pictures and upload the pictures to my laptop through USB-C. But thanks to the protection suit I might accidentally drop my Pyra while doing so, so it would be handy if it is fluoride proof to a depth of 2 meter or more.
     
    FBnil likes this.

Share This Page

Loading...