Gles2D, An Opengl(Es) Cross Platform 2D Library


kmob

Still Fresh
Joined
Feb 26, 2009
Messages
86
Regarding Windows. For a lot of people it just comes down to familiarity. Using myself as an example – I’m just more productive using Visual Studio as that’s what I’m used to using at work etc.

An operating system is a tool to do something, it’s not a religion (well except for the one true OS - AmigaOS but that’s a separate discussion!). For myself I choose the tool that enables me to get the job done in the most efficient way for my way of working. So I’m working on my Pandora projects in Visual Studio using SDL and OpenGL ES (using the PowerVR emulator) – because that’s what works best for me.

It would be a real shame if we descended into juvenile platform bashing when surely we want to make it as easy as possible for people to bring whatever skills they can to the Pandora :)
 

ldesnogu

Very Active Member
Joined
Dec 26, 2006
Messages
1,049
Age
53
Location
France
Website
Visit site
kmob, I agree. But that applies to Cpasjuste: he knows much more about Linux than he knows about Windows. So why ask him to do now something that'd be a pain for him? The advice I gave him is to concentrate on his library and then wait for someone knowledgeable to help him make his library for Windows; that will be much better for the community.
 

kmob

Still Fresh
Joined
Feb 26, 2009
Messages
86
Laurent said:
kmob, I agree. But that applies to Cpasjuste: he knows much more about Linux than he knows about Windows. So why ask him to do now something that'd be a pain for him? The advice I gave him is to concentrate on his library and then wait for someone knowledgeable to help him make his library for Windows; that will be much better for the community.

I'm not asking Cpasjuste to do anything, I'm only stating a potential reason why some people may develop in Windows.

I fully support any author developing and releasing their work however they want (closed source, open source, tomato sauce etc) and for whatever platform they want to. There is no automatic right to other people’s work (leaving aside GPL like issues).

My only comment directed at Cpasjuste would be one of appreciation . The more people that develop for the Pandora the better (as far as I’m concerned ) and libraries like his could be a great tool to make it easier for people to contribute.
 
Last edited by a moderator:

-Tj-

Active Member
Joined
Sep 2, 2009
Messages
843
AndIn^.^ said:
Virtualization? dual booting?

i seriously dont know whats wrong with all of these windows users, linux is free, free to access and use. PLUS, you soon are gonna be using a platform that runs linux, any sane developer would demand of him/her self at least a little of experience in knowing such environment, BEFORE programing for it.

so why not start now? its gonna be much tougher to get to know lin on the pandy only.

btw this is not a rant at Tj specifically but all all of the windows whiners out there:

learn technology, start using linux now!

cheers
:p

I suppose I should explain why I don't have current access to Linux. Basically, I'd tried on at least a couple occasions some years ago to get it installed on one of my laptops, but failed both times. I was using one of the LiveCD versions of Ubuntu, and it simply wouldn't work. I simply didn't have time to figure out why it wasn't working with my computer, and wasn't that I didn't/don't want to learn it.

However, you're right, I should learn it, so I'm downloading Ubuntu again now. Gonna see if that works on my new laptop, but if it doesn't go smoothly I'll have to postpone it again.

One other thing, my current (Sony) laptop does not have virtualization enabled. It's capable of it, but needs a BIOS hack to open it up to that, and seeing as I need this laptop for work, I can't afford any down time to a BIOS mishap. Sony's said that they may open it up for Windows 7's XP virtualization, but it's not set in stone.

So anyway, sorry this stirred anyone up, I seriously didn't mean it to get taken like it did. Mainly the "Windows build" was taken as "in the works" by the post on the Pandora Press blog: Link: "Windows users hold tight; a binary is in the works for you too." It's not something I just pulled out of thin air in hopes it would become true, it was out there first, and just came to show my support for it.

Edit: Crap, forgot to add the ":p" before posting. Without it it sounds a bit serious, but I am sincere in my apology. :)

Well, Ubuntu downloaded, burned, and WORKED this time! :D I was actually able to run it off the CD for a few minutes to test things out, but I've still gotta figure out how to get my bluetooth adapter working before I can use it more. Won't know my way around it till I use it more later, but I like it so far. Easy to use, lightweight. I'll play with it a bit more after I get some work done.
 
Last edited by a moderator:

Cpasjuste

Member
Joined
Apr 20, 2007
Messages
266
Heya!
No problem for the off topic etc, it's a forum after all !

I did install visual studio, and finaly (after a lot of brainstorming since it's the first time I code on windows) managed to make a gles2d DLL !
There's still a bug, the keyboard is not working (probably joypad too) and a smal crash when exiting the app but I bed I did the hardest job.
So a DLL should be available soon :)
 

dentrado

Member
Joined
Sep 17, 2008
Messages
143
-Tj- said:
One other thing, my current (Sony) laptop does not have virtualization enabled. It's capable of it, but needs a BIOS hack to open it up to that, and seeing as I need this laptop for work, I can't afford any down time to a BIOS mishap. Sony's said that they may open it up for Windows 7's XP virtualization, but it's not set in stone.

You don't need that. Virtualization apps, for example Virtualbox work anyway. Intel VT-x and the like are only to improve performance, but in reality that don't seem to be the case: Should you enable Intel VT-x in VIrtualbox?.
 
Last edited by a moderator:

-Tj-

Active Member
Joined
Sep 2, 2009
Messages
843
Cpasjuste said:
Heya!
No problem for the off topic etc, it's a forum after all !

I did install visual studio, and finaly (after a lot of brainstorming since it's the first time I code on windows) managed to make a gles2d DLL !
There's still a bug, the keyboard is not working (probably joypad too) and a smal crash when exiting the app but I bed I did the hardest job.
So a DLL should be available soon :)

Awesome! I hope this isn't too much trouble for us Windows users. :)

dentrado said:
You don't need that. Virtualization apps, for example Virtualbox work anyway. Intel VT-x and the like are only to improve performance, but in reality that don't seem to be the case: Should you enable Intel VT-x in VIrtualbox?.
It's worth a shot. I hadn't seen that one before. Installing Ubuntu on it now, crossing my fingers!
 
Last edited by a moderator:

ldesnogu

Very Active Member
Joined
Dec 26, 2006
Messages
1,049
Age
53
Location
France
Website
Visit site
Cpasjuste said:
I did install visual studio, and finaly (after a lot of brainstorming since it's the first time I code on windows) managed to make a gles2d DLL !
You mean that instead of measuring QEMU nbench you spent time on Windows? :blink:
 
Last edited by a moderator:

Cpasjuste

Member
Joined
Apr 20, 2007
Messages
266
Laurent said:
Cpasjuste said:
I did install visual studio, and finaly (after a lot of brainstorming since it's the first time I code on windows) managed to make a gles2d DLL !
You mean that instead of measuring QEMU nbench you spent time on Windows? :blink:

:ph34r:
 
Last edited by a moderator:

BookTracker

Still Fresh
Joined
Oct 14, 2008
Messages
21
-Tj- said:
It's worth a shot. I hadn't seen that one before. Installing Ubuntu on it now, crossing my fingers!

yeah virtualbox is a great software, but...

ubuntu isnt the best linux out there btw. i see ubuntu more a a linux for those that know some linux.
STILL, its what everybody is doing these days.
In fact there are many distros, and im sure you'll find your way around them in the end, i personally see mandriva and derivatives as more newbies friendly(like PClinusOS for instance). Then again UBUNTU has that 'just works' philosophy that really gets ppl.

Also, be mindful that when going into any new environment(a new OS for instance), its always helpful if you come with a clean approach to it.
What i mean by that is: i dont know anything about computers, so please linux -teach me everything!
I've found that this kind of attitude tends to be most productive since yes... you have to create a whole new mindset for 'how' things work under linux.(and OSS in general)

If you try to 'speak windows' under linux, you'll most likely get yourself a headache.
I speak from personal experience, and from seeing a lot of ppl that moved to linux over the past years. specially in the academy, where ppl cant afford to lose data over massive data corruption issues(hello vista), viruses, general unrecoverable bugs, and the whole family.
(i came to lin after 10 years of what i now call 'windows stress')

oh and one more thing, the ubuntu community is usually VERY ignorant, so when looking for a new app, ask around more... you'll find that while in the ubuntu world some windows apps have no linux equivalent, in other places you'll realize that such app has existed under linux maybe even before windows.

this is something i had to learn the hard way. truth is that ubuntu is a big blob of very different people :p , most of them just arrived in the linux scene(like me once).



best of luck, my experience has been that lin is good for programming and better yet for daily usage, if you learn to let go of those 'oh but i was -used- to doing it -this- way...' gimmicks, its a fair trade that will get you away from those scary windows crashes for ever.


BTW! i think the distro in case inside the pandy is debian(which ubuntu is derived from). so using ubuntu may be the best to start with, but do consider checking out debian later on. it may give you a better idea over what goes on, under the pandy.

cheers

note: dual botting is by far the best choice, virtualization(specially VBox) has much, much to grow yet. it works... but not with everything, and might lead to misconceptions.
-until you become more familiarized with lin, to dual boot -> install windows, then linux.(specially with OEM windows, these are a pain)
 
Last edited by a moderator:

lulzfish

Pandora Defense Squad
Joined
Jan 14, 2009
Messages
3,503
Website
troyanonymous.homelinux.com
The Pandora's default distribution will be Angstrom, which is not related to Ubuntu or Debian.

However, the learning curve between Windows and Linux is much greater than the curve between any two Linux distros (except maybe Gentoo. >:/)
So Ubuntu / Debian stuff won't translate exactly to the Pandora, but it is very, very similar, and you'll get a good headstart on people who have never used any kind of Linux.

Also, yeah, you should probably dual-boot if you think you're going to do anything serious. Virtualization is good for trying basic stuff, but it's much slower and graphical acceleration is probably nonexistent.
 

Kramy

Member
Joined
Mar 15, 2008
Messages
688
Ubuntu is great, because usually when you install it everything just works. That gives you time to get familiar with it.

Then once you begin digging deeper, either to configure stuff or screw things up, a quick Google always provides answers. I can't say that about other distros. (Mind you, they have helpful forums most of the time - but forums aren't instant responses or answers, and googled articles or forum posts are.)

I don't like Ubuntu as an XP replacement yet. Unlike most people, I spent a lot of time customizing XP to suit me, and such customization isn't available on Linux yet. I also find the whole profile and permissions thing a bit weird. I actually hacked user profiles and permissions out of my XP box so I wouldn't have to deal with them - going to an OS that's even more rigid is a bit strange.

But I have finally set up my own Ubuntu Samba NAS, which I've been playing with for months. At first it was just an experiment, for watching a few videos, but once I finally dug deep I started having fun. Just got remote desktop working securely, so I'm about ready to plunk it in the corner and use it remotely. :)

All in all, I'm liking it - but because I find the linux mounting system a bit odd, I have all my partitions mounted with drive letters. :p I also used chmod to make sure any user can access the secondary drives, because again, I find the permission thing a tad weird.

Edit:
Cpasjuste said:
I did install visual studio, and finaly (after a lot of brainstorming since it's the first time I code on windows) managed to make a gles2d DLL !
There's still a bug, the keyboard is not working (probably joypad too) and a smal crash when exiting the app but I bed I did the hardest job.
So a DLL should be available soon :)

You should get it working with Code::Blocks and MingW. Many of us Windows coders refuse to use Visual Studio. :p
 
Last edited by a moderator:

bzar

A Commando
Joined
Sep 22, 2008
Messages
4,493
Location
Finland
Website
Visit site
Kramy said:
Ubuntu is great, because usually when you install it everything just works. That gives you time to get familiar with it.

Then once you begin digging deeper, either to configure stuff or screw things up, a quick Google always provides answers. I can't say that about other distros. (Mind you, they have helpful forums most of the time - but forums aren't instant responses or answers, and googled articles or forum posts are.)
This is so true. Comparing the level of instant google support in say Ubuntu and Fedora actually surprised me. With ubuntu I can usually just google "feisty/jaunty (whatever I'm using) <problem>" and get either a clear article about it or at least an informative forum thread. I may have been looking in the wrong place, but with fedora I've had to make do with more generic support articles or articles for other distros, like ubuntu, and fill in the blanks/differences for myself.
Kramy said:
I don't like Ubuntu as an XP replacement yet. Unlike most people, I spent a lot of time customizing XP to suit me, and such customization isn't available on Linux yet.
This is a rare complaint. Not enough customization in linux compared to XP? I'd actually be interested to know what you're missing.
Kramy said:
I also find the whole profile and permissions thing a bit weird. I actually hacked user profiles and permissions out of my XP box so I wouldn't have to deal with them - going to an OS that's even more rigid is a bit strange.
Well, you could just make a root account to auto-login and never worry about any permissions, but that would be just stupid. With a basic ubuntu setup, you only need to use sudo and enter you password when making changes to the system, which shouldn't be too cumbersome. Just do your stuff in your home directory and touch the rest of the system only when making changes, and you never have to worry about permissions being hard.
Kramy said:
But I have finally set up my own Ubuntu Samba NAS, which I've been playing with for months. At first it was just an experiment, for watching a few videos, but once I finally dug deep I started having fun. Just got remote desktop working securely, so I'm about ready to plunk it in the corner and use it remotely. :)
Good to hear you've had some positive experiences as well :)
Kramy said:
All in all, I'm liking it - but because I find the linux mounting system a bit odd, I have all my partitions mounted with drive letters. :p I also used chmod to make sure any user can access the secondary drives, because again, I find the permission thing a tad weird.
Nowadays I somehow find the drive letter -type organizing a bit confusing :D. After using LVM for some time now, it actually sounds very resticting. Also if you have "general storage" space, you can of course give everyone permissions to it. However a slightly better way would be to give those permissions to a group and add all the users there, at least for writing. Well, matters of opinion.

If this conversation goes any further, it should IMO be moved out of this thread. I just felt compelled to answer :)
 
Last edited by a moderator:

Kramy

Member
Joined
Mar 15, 2008
Messages
688
B-ZaR said:
If this conversation goes any further, it should IMO be moved out of this thread. I just felt compelled to answer :)
I agree. Maybe a mod can do it if they agree.

B-ZaR said:
This is a rare complaint. Not enough customization in linux compared to XP? I'd actually be interested to know what you're missing.

My desktop. I have XP customized to have panes splattered across my desktop (they behave similar to folders), which I can swap out as needed. Basically, scrollable borderless folder windows that can be moved around, store shortcuts/files, etc.; I also set it to auto move files to auto generated folders, so if I dump something on the desktop like "Save Link for ____.txt", then that gets shoved into a folder on my storage drive and turned into a shortcut. One of the handy bits about it is I can swap out project dirs as I'm using them, and use one pane at the top of the screen as a multi-level launchbar for my favourite apps. (OSX gets HUGE launchbars once you install 200 programs, but this is just a list of scrollable shortcuts for launching. Works great!) It's really quite a nice setup, and I've never seen anything like it in another OS.

B-ZaR said:
Well, you could just make a root account to auto-login and never worry about any permissions, but that would be just stupid.
Nah! I do it the proper way, even if I find it strange. :p Although I do have auto-login set up.

I just find it strange how I can open a config file in nautilus, and not be able to save it. I have to re-open it from the terminal to do so, using sudo! That's a clunky UI if I ever did see one. ;) Basically, I never use nautilus - I just navigate around in the terminal. It's quicker that way, when your goal is to edit files... :(


B-ZaR said:
Good to hear you've had some positive experiences as well :)
It's almost all been positive. "Weird" isn't necessarily bad. Exposure to more different concepts is usually good!

B-ZaR said:
Just do your stuff in your home directory and touch the rest of the system only when making changes, and you never have to worry about permissions being hard.
I find the concept of a home directory very... strange. Perhaps it was my early exposure to it in Win2k/WinXP which put a bad taste in my mouth. In XP, if you need to reinstall, the home directory("profile") is most likely to be wiped out.

For a while, when I was just beginning my modding, I ran a multi-boot setup. (XP/XP/XP) Programs storing stuff in their own folders, like Warcraft III or many freeware apps, will run just fine on any OS once being installed once. I can also run them fine off network shares, so no reinstall is ever necessary. If they have any important registry settings, a quick batch or reg file can often solve that.

Programs storing stuff in the profile dir have to be reinstalled each time, and often can't share settings, so they have to be reconfigured every time. Sometimes they also step on each others toes, and have to be installed to different folders to prevent that. Such waste!

Linux probably does a better job than Win2k/XP, but that bad taste led me to hacking profiles entirely out.

http://img18.imagesh...rprofilesxp.png

I think I'm either logged in as Admin or System. Not sure which. It seems that XP has some profile-related delay, though - with them gone, it goes from boot menu to usable desktop in 5 seconds flat. If not for my board's horrible POST time, it'd be very impressive!

Anyway, I guess we've gotten quite off track now, but I hope that answered everything.
 
Last edited by a moderator:

Cpasjuste

Member
Joined
Apr 20, 2007
Messages
266
Kramy said:
Cpasjuste said:
I did install visual studio, and finaly (after a lot of brainstorming since it's the first time I code on windows) managed to make a gles2d DLL !
There's still a bug, the keyboard is not working (probably joypad too) and a smal crash when exiting the app but I bed I did the hardest job.
So a DLL should be available soon :)

You should get it working with Code::Blocks and MingW. Many of us Windows coders refuse to use Visual Studio. :p

If you have the DLL and the ".lib", you should be able to use it with any IDE ? or not ?
 
Last edited by a moderator:

bzar

A Commando
Joined
Sep 22, 2008
Messages
4,493
Location
Finland
Website
Visit site
Kramy said:
My desktop. I have XP customized to have panes splattered across my desktop (they behave similar to folders), which I can swap out as needed. Basically, scrollable borderless folder windows that can be moved around, store shortcuts/files, etc.;
That sounds a lot like KDE4's folder view widgets.
Kramy said:
I also set it to auto move files to auto generated folders, so if I dump something on the desktop like "Save Link for ____.txt", then that gets shoved into a folder on my storage drive and turned into a shortcut.
Scripts and modifiable context menus can handle that kind of functionality, although depending on how your system on windows is made, it could bee a tad harder to set up.
Kramy said:
One of the handy bits about it is I can swap out project dirs as I'm using them, and use one pane at the top of the screen as a multi-level launchbar for my favourite apps. (OSX gets HUGE launchbars once you install 200 programs, but this is just a list of scrollable shortcuts for launching. Works great!) It's really quite a nice setup, and I've never seen anything like it in another OS.
That does sound snappy. However I think I'd find it tedious having to expose my desktop (minimize stuff or something) to get to start programs from such launch pane. I'd much rather have something like the upcoming gnome-shell (screencasts, see the third and the fourth for the point).

Kramy said:
Nah! I do it the proper way, even if I find it strange. :p Although I do have auto-login set up.

I just find it strange how I can open a config file in nautilus, and not be able to save it. I have to re-open it from the terminal to do so, using sudo! That's a clunky UI if I ever did see one. ;) Basically, I never use nautilus - I just navigate around in the terminal. It's quicker that way, when your goal is to edit files... :(
You can use nautilus-scripts to add a "open with sudo" item in your context menu, which uses gksudo to ask you for password. Regardless, I too usually just use the terminal, as it's usually a lot faster anyways.

Kramy said:
I find the concept of a home directory very... strange. Perhaps it was my early exposure to it in Win2k/WinXP which put a bad taste in my mouth. In XP, if you need to reinstall, the home directory("profile") is most likely to be wiped out.

For a while, when I was just beginning my modding, I ran a multi-boot setup. (XP/XP/XP) Programs storing stuff in their own folders, like Warcraft III or many freeware apps, will run just fine on any OS once being installed once. I can also run them fine off network shares, so no reinstall is ever necessary. If they have any important registry settings, a quick batch or reg file can often solve that.

Programs storing stuff in the profile dir have to be reinstalled each time, and often can't share settings, so they have to be reconfigured every time. Sometimes they also step on each others toes, and have to be installed to different folders to prevent that. Such waste!
Very true. The win2k/xp home directory system is not very good. Even if you do reinstall, things are likely to get messed up when you copy your "documents and settings" folder back. Also since a lot of programs use the registry to keep their settings, you'll lose them anyway (cherry-picking the registry for all the stuff you want to save is not practical).

Kramy said:
Linux probably does a better job than Win2k/XP, but that bad taste led me to hacking profiles entirely out.
As far as my experiences go, yes it does.
 
Last edited by a moderator:

Kramy

Member
Joined
Mar 15, 2008
Messages
688
B-ZaR said:
Kramy said:
My desktop. I have XP customized to have panes splattered across my desktop (they behave similar to folders), which I can swap out as needed. Basically, scrollable borderless folder windows that can be moved around, store shortcuts/files, etc.;
That sounds a lot like KDE4's folder view widgets.
I looked it up, and that's very close! Mine is set to open folders from one of the panes in another pane. Oh, and mine is has no fancy shading or anything. It's actually invisible aside from the scrollbars...

In windows you can get to your desktop at any time with Winkey+D. It's quite possibly the fastest way to get to an icon or button to click on. Any option at all in the start menu takes more clicks and navigating. Although to be honest, I prefer Winkey+R for finding and running stuff.

B-ZaR said:
Kramy said:
I also set it to auto move files to auto generated folders, so if I dump something on the desktop like "Save Link for ____.txt", then that gets shoved into a folder on my storage drive and turned into a shortcut.
Scripts and modifiable context menus can handle that kind of functionality, although depending on how your system on windows is made, it could bee a tad harder to set up.
I don't have the knowledge to do it on linux. :(

B-ZaR said:
That does sound snappy. However I think I'd find it tedious having to expose my desktop (minimize stuff or something) to get to start programs from such launch pane. I'd much rather have something like the upcoming gnome-shell (screencasts, see the third and the fourth for the point).

Winkey+D ;) Regarding #3 and #4... that seems to be a quick way to run stuff? I do have a smart run box - I can launch any executable just by typing its name in. If there's ambiguity(multiple copies), then it just lists the full paths. Up/Down arrowkeys and a quick Enter launches the right one.

But for my run box. I was focusing more on opening folders. I wanted a box where I could type phrases (effectively) to get to the exact folder I want.

Ex:

java proj geo scr -> F:\Programming\Java\Projects\2009\LWJGL_Stuff\Screensavers\GeometryThing\
java proj geo build -> F:\Programming\Java\Projects\2009\LWJGL_Stuff\Screensavers\GeometryThing\build\
backup java geo -> \\UNAS\Storage_A3\Backups\090914\Programming\Java\Projects\2009\LWJGL_Stuff\Screensavers\GeometryThing\

Of course, "Backup java geo" sounds more like a command - but I'm happier just being able to pinpoint the folder I want.

And of course it falls apart when there's too many results. If I were to enter in a date like 090914, it'd give me a pointless amount of options. I don't have extension-based finding implemented, so I use locate32 when I'm not hunting for folders.

B-ZaR said:
Very true. The win2k/xp home directory system is not very good. Even if you do reinstall, things are likely to get messed up when you copy your "documents and settings" folder back. Also since a lot of programs use the registry to keep their settings, you'll lose them anyway (cherry-picking the registry for all the stuff you want to save is not practical).
I agree with many other Windows users, that the registry is evil. It has too many shortfalls(easy to corrupt, poor performance, etc.) to be placed at the heart of the OS. It should be replaced with a unified format for program settings, which can either be shoved in your profile dir or the program dir. That way if something gets corrupted, you've got a chance that nothing important was.

B-ZaR said:
Kramy said:
Linux probably does a better job than Win2k/XP, but that bad taste led me to hacking profiles entirely out.
As far as my experiences go, yes it does.
All the talk about shunting firmware updates and stuff to a virtual filesystem overlay made me realize Linux has a lot more power in this area. It seems like just about anything can be moved somewhere else, in Linux.
 
Last edited by a moderator:

Lozrus

Still Fresh
Joined
Nov 9, 2005
Messages
72
Age
45
Location
High Wycombe, UK
Cpasjuste said:
If you have the DLL and the ".lib", you should be able to use it with any IDE ? or not ?
In my experience that's true as long as you are providing a C API. I'm certain that I've used the same ".lib" with both Visual Studio and mingw32 compilers. C++ API's are a different story and don't even seem to work well between different versions of the same compiler (due to name mangling).

Anyway, I just spent the past 3 hours playing with GLES2D on my Ubuntu 9.10 system. Initially a was having a difficult time until I realised that the trunk of SDL 1.3 was causing the problem (insisting that my system doesn't support OpenGL). I checked out a slightly older revision and everything now worke great.

I had to tweak the Makefiles slightly (you left /src/ in various paths) but otherwise all of your examples compile perfectly here. I'll definitely use GLES2D for my first project (which currently exists as a C# based SDL.NET prototype) and let you know how I get on. I have a very long business trip, to Japan, next week which should be a great time to get started.
Just a few questions:
  • Is there any way to edit the button assignment? The controls don't seem to map very well to my USB gamepad (nothing maps to 'menu' so I can't quit any of your samples).
  • Even better, is there any way to map the pandora controls to my keyboard? I hope to do a lot of development on the long (13hr) flight, having to use a USB gamepad will probably really annoy whoever is sitting next to me :p
  • Or just a way to read the keyboard? I noticed that your samples seem to monitor for an ESC press (
    Code:
    if ( GLES2D_Keyboard[SDL_SCANCODE_ESCAPE] )
    ) but this doesn't seem to work on my system.
  • Do you plan to add an audio API? or is it ok just to use SDL_mixer?
Anyway, huge thanks, this GLES2D gives me exactly what I was hoping for.
 
Last edited by a moderator:

Cpasjuste

Member
Joined
Apr 20, 2007
Messages
266
Lozrus said:
Cpasjuste said:
If you have the DLL and the ".lib", you should be able to use it with any IDE ? or not ?
In my experience that's true as long as you are providing a C API. I'm certain that I've used the same ".lib" with both Visual Studio and mingw32 compilers. C++ API's are a different story and don't even seem to work well between different versions of the same compiler (due to name mangling).

Anyway, I just spent the past 3 hours playing with GLES2D on my Ubuntu 9.10 system. Initially a was having a difficult time until I realised that the trunk of SDL 1.3 was causing the problem (insisting that my system doesn't support OpenGL). I checked out a slightly older revision and everything now worke great.

I had to tweak the Makefiles slightly (you left /src/ in various paths) but otherwise all of your examples compile perfectly here. I'll definitely use GLES2D for my first project (which currently exists as a C# based SDL.NET prototype) and let you know how I get on. I have a very long business trip, to Japan, next week which should be a great time to get started.
Just a few questions:
  • Is there any way to edit the button assignment? The controls don't seem to map very well to my USB gamepad (nothing maps to 'menu' so I can't quit any of your samples).
  • Even better, is there any way to map the pandora controls to my keyboard? I hope to do a lot of development on the long (13hr) flight, having to use a USB gamepad will probably really annoy whoever is sitting next to me :p
  • Or just a way to read the keyboard? I noticed that your samples seem to monitor for an ESC press (
    Code:
    if ( GLES2D_Keyboard[SDL_SCANCODE_ESCAPE] )
    ) but this doesn't seem to work on my system.
  • Do you plan to add an audio API? or is it ok just to use SDL_mixer?
Anyway, huge thanks, this GLES2D gives me exactly what I was hoping for.

Yes, no problem to use SDL_mixer with the lib, since i already init sdl_video, you just have to init the audio with SDL_initSubsystem (something like that).
For the keyboard, i just fixed the code, i should upload the new build soon (there is also other fix and additions).
Else for you usb gamepad, you should edit the "GLES2D_ctrl.h" header file, at the top there is the button number for my logitech one. I should add a funciton to retrieve the button pressed, would save you some time.
 
Last edited by a moderator:
Top