Release "rocks" action game


sswam

Advanced Member
Joined
Dec 16, 2009
Messages
1,393
I wrote this game in 2003.  It's a bit like Asteroids but with gravity, no bullets, and worse graphics.
You have to hit the rocks with the pointy bit of your ship.  It's quite hard.  I'll add music at some point.

http://repo.openpandora.org/?page=detail&app=rocks-1

screenshot.png
 
Last edited by a moderator:

Ziz

Advanced Member
Joined
Jan 15, 2006
Messages
3,584
Yes. QUITE hard! However, quite addictive, too. What is it written in?
 

sswam

Advanced Member
Joined
Dec 16, 2009
Messages
1,393
What is it written in?
I wrote it originally in python/tk, then in my own dialect of C++, finally in regular C++.  With Xlib   o_O
 
Last edited by a moderator:

levi

Still fresh, damnit!
Joined
Oct 6, 2008
Messages
14,791
Location
Somewhere off the coast of the EU
Are the colours random, or are they some indication (as I originally assumed) as to whether they'll attract or repel.


Got to level 4 on my first attempt, which makes this game much easier than Balls was :)
 

sswam

Advanced Member
Joined
Dec 16, 2009
Messages
1,393
yes the colours are an indication of whether they attract or repel. Your ship has its own "hidden" colour and interacts based on that. And your ship changes colour from time to time. (a bit crazy I know!)
 

_wb_

Microbe
Staff member
Joined
Apr 5, 2012
Messages
5,390
Age
40
Location
Brussels, Belgium
Nice game!

The attraction reminds me of magnets, not really gravity. Popping magnetic balloons with a needle that breaks very easily.
 

levi

Still fresh, damnit!
Joined
Oct 6, 2008
Messages
14,791
Location
Somewhere off the coast of the EU
The needle never breaks, but if you accidentally manage to hit the side of your ship with a balloon rather than the point, you go pop instead of the balloon. Given there's no dampening to your rotation, doing the former rather than the latter can be tricky though.


I guess both gravity and magnetism work on the inverse square of the distance, so magnetic attraction and gravity are basically indistinguishable in isolation. Of course, there's no gravitational equivalent of magnetic repulsion.
 
Top