AYA EVE handheld Windows gaming pc


levi

Still fresh, damnit!
Joined
Oct 6, 2008
Messages
12,649
Location
Somewhere off the coast of the EU
Seems that even at 7 inches these days you'll have difficulty getting an actual honest landscape screen. But provided windows rotation works here that shouldn't be a problem. And it's unlikely to be a problem with linux with this thing being AMD x64 based so I'd expect xrandr to work there out of the box as well.

They've still got to actually make plastic for that thing, and make controls that actually work and aren't repurposed ipega controllers. But this being chinese, they could probably do all that by next month, the rate they're able to churn these things out.
 

Nintendo

Nintendo Switch
Joined
Oct 8, 2005
Messages
13,264
Location
Melbourne, VICTORIA - AUSTRALIA
Yeah, they're the the Number 1 country for a reason :(

I can't keep up with all these chinese Handhelds anymore, to much, to fast...but still nice to discover. xD
I mean, how fast they can go through all stages, from idea, design, prototype and finaly mass production. Must be Cheaters!


I'm impressed by the quality of these 3D printed cases, they don't use FDMs it seems. I would like to have an 3D printer that can make that quality...for a affordable FDM price of course. ;)

So awesome <3
 

matzesu

Forum Addict!
Staff member
Joined
Oct 24, 2008
Messages
9,876
Age
36
Location
Germany,, Saarland, at home
Its a bit whyrd that these Chinese Handhelds seems to pop up multiple time faster than the Pyra, yes, but on the other Side: This seems to be just a Windows 10 Tablet whit a Game Controller, nothing that complex, just take a System on a Ship, make a Square Case, and put some Controller Hardware in...

Thye have more money because they can put these faster off the Factory Band, and sell much more, so its shure there faster, also because they have more workers..

Its nothing from interest for me, as i ditnt play that much modern PC Games anymore, i even have Farming Simulator, Crysis, Borderlands 1 and 2 on the Switch, and the Other Things are for the XBOX, so nothing that special..
 

fusion_power

Advanced Member
Joined
Dec 25, 2005
Messages
13,100
Location
germany
Website
Visit site
Seems that even at 7 inches these days you'll have difficulty getting an actual honest landscape screen. But provided windows rotation works here that shouldn't be a problem. And it's unlikely to be a problem with linux with this thing being AMD x64 based so I'd expect xrandr to work there out of the box as well.
Why is the rotation thing actualy so complicated onto the Pyra project and so simple onto...well any other handheld of that kind? Is this just some Win/Linux thing or an ARM/x86 thingy?

Yeah, they're the the Number 1 country for a reason
At least when it comes to hardware. Software though... ;)
Its a bit whyrd that these Chinese Handhelds seems to pop up multiple time faster than the Pyra, yes, but on the other Side: This seems to be just a Windows 10 Tablet whit a Game Controller, nothing that complex, just take a System on a Ship, make a Square Case, and put some Controller Hardware in...

Thye have more money because they can put these faster off the Factory Band, and sell much more, so its shure there faster, also because they have more workers..
I would not even say that it is all just becuase of money. And yes, they actualy sit much closer to the sources when it comes to hardware parts and manufacturing capabilities. So I doubt that ED could have made the Pyra development much faster with money alone. Not in Europe at least, no chance. There are reasons why Hardware is mainly made in China, including the big tech companies. Sad thing though.

Overall, this AYA is an interesting device but nothing for me. The x86 design is an advantage and an big disadvantage too. I don't wand a handheld device that sucks up over 35W! Impressive from the tech side for sure but practical? I hate noise and that huge cooling fan doesn't look qiet at all (which radial fan is actualy quite?). I'm still more interested in modern ARM solutions but I hope that their x86 compatibility will increase more. I don't mind to use Windows and have it's gaming library available onto an ARM Device this way. Microsoft works on that kind of thing but AFAIK they also only use emulation. And Apple simply makes their own ARM processors - why not. :D
 
Last edited:

levi

Still fresh, damnit!
Joined
Oct 6, 2008
Messages
12,649
Location
Somewhere off the coast of the EU
Why is the rotation thing actualy so complicated onto the Pyra project and so simple onto...well any other handheld of that kind? Is this just some Win/Linux thing or an ARM/x86 thingy?
I can't be sure given what I currently know, but I think it's an x86 versus ARM thing. I've never had a problem xrandr'ing my display on linux or the equivalent on windows on any boxen I've run. But that said, both android and iOS on ARM devices are quite capable of rotating the screen according to an accelerometer. So it seems to be an artifact of the way xrandr rotates the screen doesn't work so well on ARM devices.

Or maybe, thinking on it, that's not true at all. I remember a requirement being stipulated that the framebuffer looked sensible to users expecting a landscape display, and xrandr doesn't cover that. So maybe it's just that they didn't want to make anything harder for anyone not using X for display. So actually what we've ended up with is better than these cheapo tablet things, just harder to do right.
 

daveshah

Well-Known Member
Joined
Aug 17, 2008
Messages
240
Location
(Old) Hampshire, UK
I think one of the differences is that rather more people actually care about the Intel kernel and Xorg drivers, whereas we are the only people left who care about OMAP5.

Particularly for Windows (and also Linux now I suspect too), these drivers will actually be being actively developed and supported by Intel, rather than having to make do with what TI gave us (and fortunately zmatt was able to turn this into something actually usable.)
 
Last edited:

mrpalmtop

Very Active Member
Joined
Mar 14, 2014
Messages
129
I think one of the differences is that rather more people actually care about the Intel kernel and Xorg drivers, whereas we are the only people left who care about OMAP5.

Particularly for Windows (and also Linux now I suspect too), these drivers will actually be being actively developed and supported by Intel, rather than having to make do with what TI gave us (and fortunately zmatt was able to turn this into something actually usable.)
Yes. Also, there are probably a hundred times more Windows driver programmers out there than the tiny few who know about Linux drivers. So it's architecture and software platform that has presented personnel difficulties.
 
Top