Rare dev Talks


levi

Still fresh, damnit!
Joined
Oct 6, 2008
Messages
15,685
Location
Somewhere off the coast of the EU
Three ex-Rare devs did a talk at the Centre for Computing History which I think is somewhere around Bletchley Park, on the subject of Goldeneye:
And the Q&A session is well worth a watch as well:
 
  • Like
Reactions: rSl

netcat

Hardcore Member
Joined
May 3, 2016
Messages
1,036
Location
city of thieves
Cool! I missed the n64 but remember people raving about goldeneye. I recently played it for the first time on my cracked wii and wasn't really impressed. I admittedly didn't give it a fair try. The n64 is a bit of a transition console i think. I'm a bit more into gamecube & wii. Less 3d novelty. There are a very small number of n64 games that even pique my interest: ocarina, majora, mario (everyone says it's great but...i have played galaxy) and of course star fox (fffff excellent). and goldeneye....... anyway i love old school developers. hacker culture was different back then.
 

levi

Still fresh, damnit!
Joined
Oct 6, 2008
Messages
15,685
Location
Somewhere off the coast of the EU
I bought Star Fox N64 (or Lylat Wars as it was termed here), but I found it not a patch on the SNES original. Fpr me the games that I go back to are mainly Blast Corps (although it was never a looker that game, but that doesn't stop it being good), Zelda OOT (although the DS port does improve the water temple quite a lot), and Mario Kart (although the best Mario Kart is the GBA one because it includes all of the original SNES levels as well as new ones, but the N64 version is a game I enjoyed in the past so I sometimes go back to it) and Matio Tennis (par excellence)
 

Confuzzled

Very Active Member
Joined
Oct 1, 2018
Messages
227
If historic talks to do with computing are your thing, try this:

Museum Restores 21 Rare Videos from Legendary 1976 Computing Conference

For five summer days in 1976, the first generation of computer rock stars had its own Woodstock. Coming from around the world, dozens of computing's top engineers, scientists, and software pioneers got together to reflect upon the first 25 years of their discipline in the warm, sunny (and perhaps a bit unsettling) climes of the Los Alamos National Laboratories, birthplace of the atomic bomb.
Among the speakers:

- A young Donald Knuth on the early history of programming languages

- FORTRAN designer John Backus on programming in America in the 1950s — some personal perspectives

- Harvard's Richard Milton Bloch (who worked with Grace Hopper in 1944)

- Mathematician/nuclear physicist Stanislaw M. Ulam on the interaction of mathematics and computing

- Edsger W. Dijkstra on "a programmer's early memories."
 
Top