GP32 Mario 6 Coins For Gp32?


Octavious

Programer Guru! ...in the making
Joined
Feb 2, 2004
Messages
1,795
Location
USA
Website
www.retroportables.4x2.net
I was wantin to get into gp32 programmin and i was wonderin if makeing a clone liek game of super mario 6 golden coins ( prolly my favorite sept for #3 ) on the gp32 in color and all?
post comments wether this would be smart idea for first project or not

~Octavious

PS is it ok if i use all the sprites in the game already?
or should i design my own backrounds? i dont want to , but prolly can
 

mATkEUpON

Certified Guru
Joined
Sep 30, 2003
Messages
276
Well, this would be great !!!

Any new game is worth the time passed on it if it's on the gp32 !! :D
 

Robster

Dodgy hardware mod maker
Joined
Jul 8, 2003
Messages
439
Location
New Zealand
Website
www.cobbleware.com
I don't think a game is a good idea for a first project. IMHO the steps you should take (from zero) are something like:

1) Get a good understanding of C, on a desktop computer, using a nice IDE like Visual C++ or something. You need confidence that the code you're typing is sane.
2) Start off with a really simple GP32 project, like displaying "Hello, World!" on the LCD.
3) Add things to your project. Make it to wait for a keypress, and then reset the GP32. Then add some simple sound to it. Then make the text bounce around the screen.

Once you can do all of these things, you have everything you need to make a game. The worst thing to do is take on too much at the start: I've seen plenty of people do that, and then get discouraged when things go wrong and they don't know where to look to fix them.
 

Akuma no Houkon

Certified Guru
Joined
Mar 4, 2004
Messages
1,194
Age
41
Location
USA > Washington > Everett
Website
akuma.gp32news.com
Visual C++ cost too much, download Dev C++
http://www.bloodshed.net/devcpp.html

Its an IDE that comes with a the free mingw (gcc) compiler and can be used to setup your own compiler (a GP32 compatible one) if you so choose.

Personally I wouldnt use C++ as a first language. I would use an easier language, something with more human syntax (although you cant use this on the GP32, but its good to learn on the PC) Also I wouldnt atempt game development on the GP32 without prior programing experiance.

I have experiance in OpenGL, DirectX, SDL, and over 10 years programing under my belt, yet I am still considering weather or not to start dev on the GP32. I can just see how much hell debuging that would be...
 

Akuma no Houkon

Certified Guru
Joined
Mar 4, 2004
Messages
1,194
Age
41
Location
USA > Washington > Everett
Website
akuma.gp32news.com
Shadow of Chaos posted on Mar 9 2004 at 03:26 AM said:
How do you program with that terrible spelling? no offence :blink:

Oh no, I spelled a couple of words wrong on a BBS! I must be a bad coder! After all, doesnt someones spelling on a BBS directly reflect their ability to program? Hell, speaking of which, how do you use the computer with grammer as bad as yours? Because as we all know, your ability to properly utilize the english language (on a BBS no less) it directly related to your skill in using a computer.

I don't appreciate your ignorant assumptions.
 
Last edited by a moderator:

fh36

Still Fresh
Joined
Mar 7, 2004
Messages
72
debugging sucks. it would help if it would tell you what you did wrong. most of the time its just a typo like int Five doesnt exist but you meant it to be int five. but if you get used to your IDE then you dont have any problems. i am using #Develop for C#. too bad it cant be used on gp32. C# is reeally easy to understand.

system.console.writeline("All your GP32 belong to us!");

:p :p :p :p
 

kotd

Very Active Member
Joined
Oct 1, 2003
Messages
1,173
Website
Visit site
Shadow of Chaos posted on Mar 9 2004 at 03:26 AM said:
How do you program with that terrible spelling? no offence :blink:
why even comment on how people write? as long as its readable who cares. :ph34r:
 
Last edited by a moderator:

Akuma no Houkon

Certified Guru
Joined
Mar 4, 2004
Messages
1,194
Age
41
Location
USA > Washington > Everett
Website
akuma.gp32news.com
Well some IDE's have good precompilers with usefull precompile commands which will notify you of spelling errors or case problems, etc... before compile. (or during compile), in the form of warnings or errors. And some of these, like DevC++ you can configure to work with almost any C++ compiler.

But still, to debug a GP32 app doesnt sound like fun, you cannot monitor the output as easy as you can on a PC, and I havent seen any programs that watch the registers and memory for you on the GP32 while your test app runs, you would have to write all of this yourself.

Doesnt sound like fun.
 

narmak

Member
Joined
Dec 17, 2003
Messages
173
(Shadow of Chaos @ Mar 9 2004, 03:26 AM)
How do you program with that terrible spelling? no offence


Oh no, I spelled a couple of words wrong on a BBS! I must be a bad coder! After all, doesnt someone spelling on a BBS directly reflect their ability to program? Hell, speaking of which, how do you use the computer with grammer as bad as yours? Because as we all know, your ability to properly utilize the english language (on a BBS no less) it directly related to your skill in using a computer.

I don't appreciate your ignorant assumptions.

You know, he is right. Seriously, even if he had bad spelling, i have never ran into a case where i have thought "wow, if i had horrible spelling, i would have no way of programming this!" It gives me the feeling that you don't know how to program yourself. In any case, i find it annoying that you are posting things like this, please stop. thanks.
 

fh36

Still Fresh
Joined
Mar 7, 2004
Messages
72
do we need a hug people?... no.... :( well anyways, i was thinking of #Develops precompile stuff. it will tell you before you even compile that you errors to fix. i can never get that damned debugger to work. it acts like there is a read/write error whever it is stored on my HD.

system.console.writeline("Do we need to hug?");
 

Robster

Dodgy hardware mod maker
Joined
Jul 8, 2003
Messages
439
Location
New Zealand
Website
www.cobbleware.com
Akuma no Houkon: I believe narmak was supporting you, not adding to Shadow of Chaos' petty comment. Chill, man - if you don't get worse insults than that around here, you're doing something wrong :)

I believe that there are some C/C++ programming books out there that you can buy, which included Visual C++ version 6 standard edition as "Cover CDs", so you can get VC++ for about $30. Standard edition doesn't do good optimisation, and cannot build statically linked applications, but apart from that it's the real deal. In my experience, it's up there with the best IDEs around - that's for editor features like structure member listing when you type the structure's name, value tooltips while debugging, and integration of the compiler/linker etc.

As for the comment that "debugging on GP32 doesn't sound like fun", well, curiously, I do find it fun, precisely because everything isn't instantly visible. While it can be frustrating, and sometimes you sit there staring at the thing wanting to smash it into pieces, you also end up getting really creative about ways to get the information you need. I'd advise you to give it a shot, you may like it! Remember, Linus Torvalds doesn't use a debugger :)

Finally, fh36, please explain to me how
Code:
system.console.writeline("Do we need to hug?");
is easier than
Code:
printf ("Do we need to hug?\n");
or even
Code:
cout << "Do we need to hug?" << endln;
:D
 

fh36

Still Fresh
Joined
Mar 7, 2004
Messages
72
:angry: well you have a point there. but i tryed to learn c and c++ more than once and i oculd never get through the book. but with C# i got through it pretty quickly. maybe its just me but like C# and think it is easier than C/C++ to learn. in text output it is alot more code but in other areas it is easy-fa-sheezy. i mean i had no clue what functions were in C/C++ ( dont think they are called functions in C/C++) but in C# i made 3 crappy programs that used functions just for fun.

using System;

namespace funkyfunctions
{
///<summary>
/// Summary description for Class1
/// </summary>
class ApplicationClass
{
///<summary>
/// The main entry point for the application.
/// </summary>
[STAThread]
static void Main(string[] args)
{
System.Console.WriteLine("Welcome to the Funky Functions!");
FunkyOne();
FunkyTwo();
FunkyThree();
FunkyThree();
FunkyTwo();
FunkyOne();

string close;
System.Console.WriteLine("Press the Enter Key to close the window...");
close = System.Console.ReadLine();
}

static void FunkyOne()
{
System.Console.WriteLine("//1\\");
}

static void FunkyTwo()
{
System.Console.WriteLine("//2\\");
}

static void FunkyThree()
{
System.Console.WriteLine("//3\\");
}

}
}

there is an example of the crap that i did because i thought it was so fun. and i geuss we better bet back on topic. :rolleyes:
 

Robster

Dodgy hardware mod maker
Joined
Jul 8, 2003
Messages
439
Location
New Zealand
Website
www.cobbleware.com
I think it's all quite on-topic :). Learning your first computer language is quite a hill to climb, so it's probably a good idea to look around and find one that you like the look of. I bet that now you've learned one you could pick up others much more easily. My original point was that you should learn your first language in a nice warm comfy environment like VC++ because jumping straight into GP32 coding adds a few extra complications.

Functions are called functions in C and in C++ :D

Just for fun, note the similarities between your program and the same thing in C. The differences are mainly:
1) namespaces are a feature of C++, but not of C
2) I don't know what the <summary></summary> stuff does, but C doesn't have it.
3) If you don't include a prototype for a function, you must include the function body before any calls to it (that's a subtle one, don't worry too much about it).
4) Inside a string, the '\' character is an escape, which you can use to put control characters in the string- eg. \r is carriage return, \t is tab etc. Because of this, if you want the actual character '\' in your string, you have to put \\
5) printf doesn't put a carriage return at the end of a line, you have to put \n if you want that.

Code:
#include <stdio.h>  /* similar to "using System;" */

/* Include the function bodies before main() which is where they're called from */
static void FunkyOne (void)
{
   printf ("//1\\\\\n"); /* prints "//1\\" and moves to the next line */
}

static void FunkyTwo (void)
{
   printf ("//2\\\\\n"); /* prints "//2\\" and moves to the next line */
}

static void FunkyThree (void)
{
   printf ("//3\\\\\n"); /* prints "//3\\" and moves to the next line */
}

/* The main entry point for the application */
void main ( int argc, char *argv[])
{
   int ch; /* need this for later */

   printf ("Welcome to the Funky Functions!\n");
   FunkyOne();
   FunkyTwo();
   FunkyThree();
   FunkyThree();
   FunkyTwo();
   FunkyOne();

   do
   {
      ch = getchar();   /* get a key from the keyboard */
   } while (ch != '\n');  /* loop around until the key is [enter]. */
}
 

toxik

Still Fresh
Joined
Nov 16, 2003
Messages
35
Age
32
Location
England
Website
Visit site
woah... :blink: there seems to be some crazy code flying round here, I was under the impression that C++ was the same as C but with some extra functions that you can use, but it seems instead of :
Code:
 cout << "hello";

its something like...
Code:
printf << "hello";

...or something...

C and C++ sound quite different... :rolleyes:
 

fh36

Still Fresh
Joined
Mar 7, 2004
Messages
72
c++ is a little bit differant that c. but it was based on c too so it alos hold alot of the stuff that c does. C# was based on C++ and is like it but is also very differant. C and C++ can run on nearly all modern computers ( not just desktops but handhelds, consoles, cellphones, etc. anything with a modern processor) but C# is a bit wierd. you have to have the .NET Framework installed on the machine you want the programs to run on ( the .NET Framework Redistribute is smaller that the reg. .NET Framework and wil still allow you to run C# and a few other newer languages) and there wont be a .NET Framework for GP32 (well you dont have to have the whole frameowork, just the .DLLs and crap like that, just need librarys and some run-time stuff).

Robster- in C# the functions dont have to be in front of Main() like they do in C++. which is kinda cool i geuss but it really doesnt matter, cus you will have to go back and forth to addd functions and call them in your Main(). and as for <summary> and </summary>, i have no clue my book doesnt mention it and every example program it shows leaves those basically empty. i think that they are for the programmer and anyone who is reading the code to get a summary of what is going on. so you can leave your comments in your functions and Main(). i have seen alot of source code where people make huge summarys of the program in the middle of the Main() where they really shouldnt be. its not harming anything but it is untidy.
 

Daz_Genetic

Certified Guru
Joined
Oct 26, 2003
Messages
424
Age
43
Location
Maine, USA
Website
www.dazos.com
Robster is correct. Learn programming in an easy to use environment, becasue learning to setup and configure development environments is a totally different skillset.

I am currently using Bloodshed's Dev C++ which is a great freeware IDE that has the mingw compiler fully integrated. It is very easy to use, it updates itself over the internet and creates some pretty well optimized code. I fully recommend it to anyone wishing to learn programming.

Learn first on the PC, then learn the specifics of each hardware platform. Just try not to rely on libraries that exist outside of the Standard libraries and everything should be portable.
 
Top