Gba Emulator

Status
Not open for further replies.

sam fisher

Well-Known Member
Joined
Apr 11, 2004
Messages
9,452
Location
Bristol, UK
Website
blog.peter-r.co.uk
thats not emulation. Here is a definition of emulation:

Definitions of EMULATION on the Web:

The imitation of a computer system, performed by a combination of hardware and software, that allows programs to run between incompatible systems.
www.rvcomp.com/wiring/EIA/glossary.htm


Refers to the ability of a program or device to imitate another program or device. Many printers, for example, are designed to emulate Hewlett-Packard LaserJet printers because so much software is written for HP printers. By emulating an HP printer, a printer can work with any software written for a real HP printer. Emulation tricks the software into believing that a device is really some other device. Communications software packages often include terminal emulation drivers. This enables your PC to emulate a particular type of terminal so that you can log on to a mainframe. It is also possible for a computer to emulate another type of computer. For example, there are programs that enable an Apple Macintosh to emulate a PC.
www.5starsupport.com/info/glossary.htm


The process by which a device is built to work like another. For example, a chip can be designed to emulate another model and execute software that was written to run in the other design. The emulator can be hardware, software or both.
www.synopsys.com/news/pr_kit/eda_glossary.html


A process by which a computer imitates the actions of another computer, so that the imitating system accepts the same data and executes the same computer programs as the imitated system.
ccs.uchicago.edu/technotes/misc/Glossary/gloss2.html


behavior like another type of entity, usually as in "terminal emulation." Terminal emulation software such as Kermit, ZTerm or ProComm allows a desktop computer to emulate (act like, display data from, interactively log in to) a terminal on a multi-user server-computer in a remote location, over phone lines via modems at both ends, or via hardwiring.
cai.ucdavis.edu/instruction/netgloss.htm


The process of imitation (simulation) of one computer system by another. The imitating program, or device (emulator), accepts the same data, executes the same programs, and achieves the same results.
www.nuhorizons.com/Glossary/ComputerConcepts.html


A DIGITAL PRESERVATION STRATEGY whereby digital materials are stored in their original format as a bit stream and software and hardware emulators are employed to mimic the behaviour of obsolete hardware platforms and emulate the relevant operating system to allow for access.
www.leeds.ac.uk/cedars/documents/PSW01.htm


The imitation, performed by a combination of hardware and software, of all or part of one device, terminal, or computer by another, so that the imitating device accepts the same data, performs the same functions, and appears to other network devices as if it were the imitated device. Emulation allows programs to run between incompatible systems.
www.oregoninnovation.org/pressroom/glossary.d-f.html


Replication of a computing system to process programs and data from an early system that is no longer available.
www.cs.cornell.edu/wya/DigLib/MS1999/glossary.html


In mainframe computing, software that allows a PC workstation to "imitate" or perform as a mainframe terminal.
www.aits.uillinois.edu/glossary/glossarye.html


A means of overcoming technological obsolescence of hardware and software by developing techniques for imitating obsolete systems on future generations of computers.
www.dpconline.org/graphics/intro/definitions.html


Emulation is said to happen when a system, or a program, performs in the same way as another system. A computer can emulate another type of computer in order to run its programs. Sometimes terminal emulation is necessary in order for one computer to make a network connection with another.
www.aot.state.vt.us/CaddHelp/cadd/glossary/gloss_e.htm


A way to allow software to run on a processor it was not designed for. When you run an application written for a 68K processor (such as the Quandra) on a Power Mac (which has a PowerPC chip), it runs in emulation mode (which is slower than native code would be). Emulation mode requires an emulator, a piece of software that imitates the native processor. For example, the Power Macs have a 68LC040 emulator built into their ROM chips and can come with SoftWindows, an emulator that lets you run PC progams. Compare native.
www.lcmug.com/glossary_E.htm


The use of special control programs to make a new computer system "act" like an older one, thus enabling a business to execute its older programs while software conversion takes place.
www.indstate.edu/cape/glossary.html


To get a clear idea of exactly what Emulation is, you must first have a clear understanding of what the word "emulation" means. Quite simply put, emulation is the act of imitating another. You could say, for example, that a stunt double is "emulating" the real actor in the movie for certain shots. While the double may not actually be the actor, he does mirror him very closely. Software looks and acts just like the H card, and can actually convince the receiver that it is indeed a valid H card. The important idea, however, is that if DirecTV ever sends down some sort of killer attack, it is just the software on a cheap floppy disk that could be potentially damaged as opposed to an expensive H Card. This is why emulation is so attractive to DirecTV hackers.
www.dssmafia.com/dictionary.php


(1) The use of programming techniques and special machine features to permit a computing system to run programs written for another system.
www-3.ibm.com/software/network/commserver/library/publications/csaix_60/dyyl1m05.htm


The imitation of all or part of one device, terminal, or computer by another, so that the imitating device accepts the same data, performs the same functions, & appears to other network devices as if it were the imitated devices.
www.connectworld.net/iec/Browse02/GLSE.html


– The imitation of a computer system, performed by a combination of hardware and software, that allows programs to run between incompatible systems.
www.liquorstorepos.com/html/Glossary.htm


Using software which makes a PC behave as though it were a terminal, or which alters the characteristics of a user's terminal to act as a different type of terminal.
www.uic.edu/depts/accc/inform/v106d.html


The imitation by one computing device or program of another device or program. This allows the client and the server to conduct transparent access to networked resources. VT100 is one of the most common telecommunications emulations.
www.ala.org/rusa/mars/glossary.html


Software that you load on an Apple Mac computer to make it work like a PC operating system so Windows applications can be run.
www.ephotozine.com/glossary/index.cfm


Recreation of a system that will behave just like an original computing environment based on detailed specifications of that environment. [Arms, 2001, p. 260.]
digitalib.geometaphors.com/west/glossary/


A network activity in which a computer acts as if it is another kind of computer or terminal. An example is when a Macintosh user opens a remote terminal session to a VAX, it may run a program that emulates a DEC VT240 terminal.
www.zocalo.net/tng/glossary/glos_e.html


Hardware or software, or a combination of the two, that behaves like another device or program, like PCs emulating dumb terminals.
www.acc-net.com/Kahuna/glossaryE.htm


A technique that allows a piece of software or hardware to ‘act’ like another in order to cooperate with otherwise incompatible products. A very common use of emulation is using a printer with certain types of software.
www.visionsofadonai.com/onrampglossary2.html


ambition to equal or excel
www.cogsci.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/webwn


(computer science) technique of one machine obtaining the same results as another
www.cogsci.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/webwn


effort to equal or surpass another
www.cogsci.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/webwn




There for a GBA cannot emulate itself.
 
P

pAiN

Guest
Good job Sam.. top notch explanations. *emulates Sam Fisher*

thats not emulation. Here is a definition of emulation:

Definitions of EMULATION on the Web:

The imitation of a computer system, performed by a combination of hardware and software, that allows programs to run between incompatible systems.
www.rvcomp.com/wiring/EIA/glossary.htm


Refers to the ability of a program or device to imitate another program or device. Many printers, for example, are designed to emulate Hewlett-Packard LaserJet printers because so much software is written for HP printers. By emulating an HP printer, a printer can work with any software written for a real HP printer. Emulation tricks the software into believing that a device is really some other device. Communications software packages often include terminal emulation drivers. This enables your PC to emulate a particular type of terminal so that you can log on to a mainframe. It is also possible for a computer to emulate another type of computer. For example, there are programs that enable an Apple Macintosh to emulate a PC.
www.5starsupport.com/info/glossary.htm


The process by which a device is built to work like another. For example, a chip can be designed to emulate another model and execute software that was written to run in the other design. The emulator can be hardware, software or both.
www.synopsys.com/news/pr_kit/eda_glossary.html


A process by which a computer imitates the actions of another computer, so that the imitating system accepts the same data and executes the same computer programs as the imitated system.
ccs.uchicago.edu/technotes/misc/Glossary/gloss2.html


behavior like another type of entity, usually as in "terminal emulation." Terminal emulation software such as Kermit, ZTerm or ProComm allows a desktop computer to emulate (act like, display data from, interactively log in to) a terminal on a multi-user server-computer in a remote location, over phone lines via modems at both ends, or via hardwiring.
cai.ucdavis.edu/instruction/netgloss.htm


The process of imitation (simulation) of one computer system by another. The imitating program, or device (emulator), accepts the same data, executes the same programs, and achieves the same results.
www.nuhorizons.com/Glossary/ComputerConcepts.html


A DIGITAL PRESERVATION STRATEGY whereby digital materials are stored in their original format as a bit stream and software and hardware emulators are employed to mimic the behaviour of obsolete hardware platforms and emulate the relevant operating system to allow for access.
www.leeds.ac.uk/cedars/documents/PSW01.htm


The imitation, performed by a combination of hardware and software, of all or part of one device, terminal, or computer by another, so that the imitating device accepts the same data, performs the same functions, and appears to other network devices as if it were the imitated device. Emulation allows programs to run between incompatible systems.
www.oregoninnovation.org/pressroom/glossary.d-f.html


Replication of a computing system to process programs and data from an early system that is no longer available.
www.cs.cornell.edu/wya/DigLib/MS1999/glossary.html


In mainframe computing, software that allows a PC workstation to "imitate" or perform as a mainframe terminal.
www.aits.uillinois.edu/glossary/glossarye.html


A means of overcoming technological obsolescence of hardware and software by developing techniques for imitating obsolete systems on future generations of computers.
www.dpconline.org/graphics/intro/definitions.html


Emulation is said to happen when a system, or a program, performs in the same way as another system. A computer can emulate another type of computer in order to run its programs. Sometimes terminal emulation is necessary in order for one computer to make a network connection with another.
www.aot.state.vt.us/CaddHelp/cadd/glossary/gloss_e.htm


A way to allow software to run on a processor it was not designed for. When you run an application written for a 68K processor (such as the Quandra) on a Power Mac (which has a PowerPC chip), it runs in emulation mode (which is slower than native code would be). Emulation mode requires an emulator, a piece of software that imitates the native processor. For example, the Power Macs have a 68LC040 emulator built into their ROM chips and can come with SoftWindows, an emulator that lets you run PC progams. Compare native.
www.lcmug.com/glossary_E.htm


The use of special control programs to make a new computer system "act" like an older one, thus enabling a business to execute its older programs while software conversion takes place.
www.indstate.edu/cape/glossary.html


To get a clear idea of exactly what Emulation is, you must first have a clear understanding of what the word "emulation" means. Quite simply put, emulation is the act of imitating another. You could say, for example, that a stunt double is "emulating" the real actor in the movie for certain shots. While the double may not actually be the actor, he does mirror him very closely. Software looks and acts just like the H card, and can actually convince the receiver that it is indeed a valid H card. The important idea, however, is that if DirecTV ever sends down some sort of killer attack, it is just the software on a cheap floppy disk that could be potentially damaged as opposed to an expensive H Card. This is why emulation is so attractive to DirecTV hackers.
www.dssmafia.com/dictionary.php


(1) The use of programming techniques and special machine features to permit a computing system to run programs written for another system.
www-3.ibm.com/software/network/commserver/library/publications/csaix_60/dyyl1m05.htm


The imitation of all or part of one device, terminal, or computer by another, so that the imitating device accepts the same data, performs the same functions, & appears to other network devices as if it were the imitated devices.
www.connectworld.net/iec/Browse02/GLSE.html


– The imitation of a computer system, performed by a combination of hardware and software, that allows programs to run between incompatible systems.
www.liquorstorepos.com/html/Glossary.htm


Using software which makes a PC behave as though it were a terminal, or which alters the characteristics of a user's terminal to act as a different type of terminal.
www.uic.edu/depts/accc/inform/v106d.html


The imitation by one computing device or program of another device or program. This allows the client and the server to conduct transparent access to networked resources. VT100 is one of the most common telecommunications emulations.
www.ala.org/rusa/mars/glossary.html


Software that you load on an Apple Mac computer to make it work like a PC operating system so Windows applications can be run.
www.ephotozine.com/glossary/index.cfm


Recreation of a system that will behave just like an original computing environment based on detailed specifications of that environment. [Arms, 2001, p. 260.]
digitalib.geometaphors.com/west/glossary/


A network activity in which a computer acts as if it is another kind of computer or terminal. An example is when a Macintosh user opens a remote terminal session to a VAX, it may run a program that emulates a DEC VT240 terminal.
www.zocalo.net/tng/glossary/glos_e.html


Hardware or software, or a combination of the two, that behaves like another device or program, like PCs emulating dumb terminals.
www.acc-net.com/Kahuna/glossaryE.htm


A technique that allows a piece of software or hardware to ‘act’ like another in order to cooperate with otherwise incompatible products. A very common use of emulation is using a printer with certain types of software.
www.visionsofadonai.com/onrampglossary2.html


ambition to equal or excel
www.cogsci.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/webwn


(computer science) technique of one machine obtaining the same results as another
www.cogsci.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/webwn


effort to equal or surpass another
www.cogsci.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/webwn




There for a GBA cannot emulate itself.

:p :p :p we'll be on page2 in no time
 

sam fisher

Well-Known Member
Joined
Apr 11, 2004
Messages
9,452
Location
Bristol, UK
Website
blog.peter-r.co.uk
pAiN posted on Oct 22 2004 at 06:09 PM said:
Good job Sam.. top notch explanations. *emulates Sam Fisher*

thats not emulation. Here is a definition of emulation:

Definitions of EMULATION on the Web:

The imitation of a computer system, performed by a combination of hardware and software, that allows programs to run between incompatible systems.
www.rvcomp.com/wiring/EIA/glossary.htm


Refers to the ability of a program or device to imitate another program or device. Many printers, for example, are designed to emulate Hewlett-Packard LaserJet printers because so much software is written for HP printers. By emulating an HP printer, a printer can work with any software written for a real HP printer. Emulation tricks the software into believing that a device is really some other device. Communications software packages often include terminal emulation drivers. This enables your PC to emulate a particular type of terminal so that you can log on to a mainframe. It is also possible for a computer to emulate another type of computer. For example, there are programs that enable an Apple Macintosh to emulate a PC.
www.5starsupport.com/info/glossary.htm


The process by which a device is built to work like another. For example, a chip can be designed to emulate another model and execute software that was written to run in the other design. The emulator can be hardware, software or both.
www.synopsys.com/news/pr_kit/eda_glossary.html


A process by which a computer imitates the actions of another computer, so that the imitating system accepts the same data and executes the same computer programs as the imitated system.
ccs.uchicago.edu/technotes/misc/Glossary/gloss2.html


behavior like another type of entity, usually as in "terminal emulation." Terminal emulation software such as Kermit, ZTerm or ProComm allows a desktop computer to emulate (act like, display data from, interactively log in to) a terminal on a multi-user server-computer in a remote location, over phone lines via modems at both ends, or via hardwiring.
cai.ucdavis.edu/instruction/netgloss.htm


The process of imitation (simulation) of one computer system by another. The imitating program, or device (emulator), accepts the same data, executes the same programs, and achieves the same results.
www.nuhorizons.com/Glossary/ComputerConcepts.html


A DIGITAL PRESERVATION STRATEGY whereby digital materials are stored in their original format as a bit stream and software and hardware emulators are employed to mimic the behaviour of obsolete hardware platforms and emulate the relevant operating system to allow for access.
www.leeds.ac.uk/cedars/documents/PSW01.htm


The imitation, performed by a combination of hardware and software, of all or part of one device, terminal, or computer by another, so that the imitating device accepts the same data, performs the same functions, and appears to other network devices as if it were the imitated device. Emulation allows programs to run between incompatible systems.
www.oregoninnovation.org/pressroom/glossary.d-f.html


Replication of a computing system to process programs and data from an early system that is no longer available.
www.cs.cornell.edu/wya/DigLib/MS1999/glossary.html


In mainframe computing, software that allows a PC workstation to "imitate" or perform as a mainframe terminal.
www.aits.uillinois.edu/glossary/glossarye.html


A means of overcoming technological obsolescence of hardware and software by developing techniques for imitating obsolete systems on future generations of computers.
www.dpconline.org/graphics/intro/definitions.html


Emulation is said to happen when a system, or a program, performs in the same way as another system. A computer can emulate another type of computer in order to run its programs. Sometimes terminal emulation is necessary in order for one computer to make a network connection with another.
www.aot.state.vt.us/CaddHelp/cadd/glossary/gloss_e.htm


A way to allow software to run on a processor it was not designed for. When you run an application written for a 68K processor (such as the Quandra) on a Power Mac (which has a PowerPC chip), it runs in emulation mode (which is slower than native code would be). Emulation mode requires an emulator, a piece of software that imitates the native processor. For example, the Power Macs have a 68LC040 emulator built into their ROM chips and can come with SoftWindows, an emulator that lets you run PC progams. Compare native.
www.lcmug.com/glossary_E.htm


The use of special control programs to make a new computer system "act" like an older one, thus enabling a business to execute its older programs while software conversion takes place.
www.indstate.edu/cape/glossary.html


To get a clear idea of exactly what Emulation is, you must first have a clear understanding of what the word "emulation" means. Quite simply put, emulation is the act of imitating another. You could say, for example, that a stunt double is "emulating" the real actor in the movie for certain shots. While the double may not actually be the actor, he does mirror him very closely. Software looks and acts just like the H card, and can actually convince the receiver that it is indeed a valid H card. The important idea, however, is that if DirecTV ever sends down some sort of killer attack, it is just the software on a cheap floppy disk that could be potentially damaged as opposed to an expensive H Card. This is why emulation is so attractive to DirecTV hackers.
www.dssmafia.com/dictionary.php


(1) The use of programming techniques and special machine features to permit a computing system to run programs written for another system.
www-3.ibm.com/software/network/commserver/library/publications/csaix_60/dyyl1m05.htm


The imitation of all or part of one device, terminal, or computer by another, so that the imitating device accepts the same data, performs the same functions, & appears to other network devices as if it were the imitated devices.
www.connectworld.net/iec/Browse02/GLSE.html


– The imitation of a computer system, performed by a combination of hardware and software, that allows programs to run between incompatible systems.
www.liquorstorepos.com/html/Glossary.htm


Using software which makes a PC behave as though it were a terminal, or which alters the characteristics of a user's terminal to act as a different type of terminal.
www.uic.edu/depts/accc/inform/v106d.html


The imitation by one computing device or program of another device or program. This allows the client and the server to conduct transparent access to networked resources. VT100 is one of the most common telecommunications emulations.
www.ala.org/rusa/mars/glossary.html


Software that you load on an Apple Mac computer to make it work like a PC operating system so Windows applications can be run.
www.ephotozine.com/glossary/index.cfm


Recreation of a system that will behave just like an original computing environment based on detailed specifications of that environment. [Arms, 2001, p. 260.]
digitalib.geometaphors.com/west/glossary/


A network activity in which a computer acts as if it is another kind of computer or terminal. An example is when a Macintosh user opens a remote terminal session to a VAX, it may run a program that emulates a DEC VT240 terminal.
www.zocalo.net/tng/glossary/glos_e.html


Hardware or software, or a combination of the two, that behaves like another device or program, like PCs emulating dumb terminals.
www.acc-net.com/Kahuna/glossaryE.htm


A technique that allows a piece of software or hardware to ‘act’ like another in order to cooperate with otherwise incompatible products. A very common use of emulation is using a printer with certain types of software.
www.visionsofadonai.com/onrampglossary2.html


ambition to equal or excel
www.cogsci.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/webwn


(computer science) technique of one machine obtaining the same results as another
www.cogsci.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/webwn


effort to equal or surpass another
www.cogsci.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/webwn




There for a GBA cannot emulate itself.

:p :p :p we'll be on page2 in no time
LOL :lol:
 
Last edited by a moderator:

taras

Mega Pandora mania
Joined
Jun 17, 2003
Messages
934
Location
Scotland
Website
taras.net
sam fisher posted on Oct 22 2004 at 05:10 PM said:
pAiN posted on Oct 22 2004 at 06:09 PM said:
Good job Sam.. top notch explanations.  *emulates Sam Fisher*

thats not emulation. Here is a definition of emulation:

Definitions of EMULATION on the Web:

The imitation of a computer system, performed by a combination of hardware and software, that allows programs to run between incompatible systems.
www.rvcomp.com/wiring/EIA/glossary.htm


Refers to the ability of a program or device to imitate another program or device. Many printers, for example, are designed to emulate Hewlett-Packard LaserJet printers because so much software is written for HP printers. By emulating an HP printer, a printer can work with any software written for a real HP printer. Emulation tricks the software into believing that a device is really some other device. Communications software packages often include terminal emulation drivers. This enables your PC to emulate a particular type of terminal so that you can log on to a mainframe. It is also possible for a computer to emulate another type of computer. For example, there are programs that enable an Apple Macintosh to emulate a PC.
www.5starsupport.com/info/glossary.htm


The process by which a device is built to work like another. For example, a chip can be designed to emulate another model and execute software that was written to run in the other design. The emulator can be hardware, software or both.
www.synopsys.com/news/pr_kit/eda_glossary.html


A process by which a computer imitates the actions of another computer, so that the imitating system accepts the same data and executes the same computer programs as the imitated system.
ccs.uchicago.edu/technotes/misc/Glossary/gloss2.html


behavior like another type of entity, usually as in "terminal emulation." Terminal emulation software such as Kermit, ZTerm or ProComm allows a desktop computer to emulate (act like, display data from, interactively log in to) a terminal on a multi-user server-computer in a remote location, over phone lines via modems at both ends, or via hardwiring.
cai.ucdavis.edu/instruction/netgloss.htm


The process of imitation (simulation) of one computer system by another. The imitating program, or device (emulator), accepts the same data, executes the same programs, and achieves the same results.
www.nuhorizons.com/Glossary/ComputerConcepts.html


A DIGITAL PRESERVATION STRATEGY whereby digital materials are stored in their original format as a bit stream and software and hardware emulators are employed to mimic the behaviour of obsolete hardware platforms and emulate the relevant operating system to allow for access.
www.leeds.ac.uk/cedars/documents/PSW01.htm


The imitation, performed by a combination of hardware and software, of all or part of one device, terminal, or computer by another, so that the imitating device accepts the same data, performs the same functions, and appears to other network devices as if it were the imitated device. Emulation allows programs to run between incompatible systems.
www.oregoninnovation.org/pressroom/glossary.d-f.html


Replication of a computing system to process programs and data from an early system that is no longer available.
www.cs.cornell.edu/wya/DigLib/MS1999/glossary.html


In mainframe computing, software that allows a PC workstation to "imitate" or perform as a mainframe terminal.
www.aits.uillinois.edu/glossary/glossarye.html


A means of overcoming technological obsolescence of hardware and software by developing techniques for imitating obsolete systems on future generations of computers.
www.dpconline.org/graphics/intro/definitions.html


Emulation is said to happen when a system, or a program, performs in the same way as another system. A computer can emulate another type of computer in order to run its programs. Sometimes terminal emulation is necessary in order for one computer to make a network connection with another.
www.aot.state.vt.us/CaddHelp/cadd/glossary/gloss_e.htm


A way to allow software to run on a processor it was not designed for. When you run an application written for a 68K processor (such as the Quandra) on a Power Mac (which has a PowerPC chip), it runs in emulation mode (which is slower than native code would be). Emulation mode requires an emulator, a piece of software that imitates the native processor. For example, the Power Macs have a 68LC040 emulator built into their ROM chips and can come with SoftWindows, an emulator that lets you run PC progams. Compare native.
www.lcmug.com/glossary_E.htm


The use of special control programs to make a new computer system "act" like an older one, thus enabling a business to execute its older programs while software conversion takes place.
www.indstate.edu/cape/glossary.html


To get a clear idea of exactly what Emulation is, you must first have a clear understanding of what the word "emulation" means. Quite simply put, emulation is the act of imitating another. You could say, for example, that a stunt double is "emulating" the real actor in the movie for certain shots. While the double may not actually be the actor, he does mirror him very closely. Software looks and acts just like the H card, and can actually convince the receiver that it is indeed a valid H card. The important idea, however, is that if DirecTV ever sends down some sort of killer attack, it is just the software on a cheap floppy disk that could be potentially damaged as opposed to an expensive H Card. This is why emulation is so attractive to DirecTV hackers.
www.dssmafia.com/dictionary.php


(1) The use of programming techniques and special machine features to permit a computing system to run programs written for another system.
www-3.ibm.com/software/network/commserver/library/publications/csaix_60/dyyl1m05.htm


The imitation of all or part of one device, terminal, or computer by another, so that the imitating device accepts the same data, performs the same functions, & appears to other network devices as if it were the imitated devices.
www.connectworld.net/iec/Browse02/GLSE.html


– The imitation of a computer system, performed by a combination of hardware and software, that allows programs to run between incompatible systems.
www.liquorstorepos.com/html/Glossary.htm


Using software which makes a PC behave as though it were a terminal, or which alters the characteristics of a user's terminal to act as a different type of terminal.
www.uic.edu/depts/accc/inform/v106d.html


The imitation by one computing device or program of another device or program. This allows the client and the server to conduct transparent access to networked resources. VT100 is one of the most common telecommunications emulations.
www.ala.org/rusa/mars/glossary.html


Software that you load on an Apple Mac computer to make it work like a PC operating system so Windows applications can be run.
www.ephotozine.com/glossary/index.cfm


Recreation of a system that will behave just like an original computing environment based on detailed specifications of that environment. [Arms, 2001, p. 260.]
digitalib.geometaphors.com/west/glossary/


A network activity in which a computer acts as if it is another kind of computer or terminal. An example is when a Macintosh user opens a remote terminal session to a VAX, it may run a program that emulates a DEC VT240 terminal.
www.zocalo.net/tng/glossary/glos_e.html


Hardware or software, or a combination of the two, that behaves like another device or program, like PCs emulating dumb terminals.
www.acc-net.com/Kahuna/glossaryE.htm


A technique that allows a piece of software or hardware to ‘act’ like another in order to cooperate with otherwise incompatible products. A very common use of emulation is using a printer with certain types of software.
www.visionsofadonai.com/onrampglossary2.html


ambition to equal or excel
www.cogsci.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/webwn


(computer science) technique of one machine obtaining the same results as another
www.cogsci.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/webwn


effort to equal or surpass another
www.cogsci.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/webwn




There for a GBA cannot emulate itself.

:p  :p  :p  we'll be on page2 in no time
LOL :lol:
Lollers :wub: B)
 
Last edited by a moderator:

PAUL103DOGS

Member
Joined
Apr 15, 2004
Messages
107
Location
URanus
Website
Visit site
sam fisher posted on Oct 22 2004 at 05:10 PM said:
pAiN posted on Oct 22 2004 at 06:09 PM said:
Good job Sam.. top notch explanations.  *emulates Sam Fisher*

thats not emulation. Here is a definition of emulation:

Definitions of EMULATION on the Web:

The imitation of a computer system, performed by a combination of hardware and software, that allows programs to run between incompatible systems.
www.rvcomp.com/wiring/EIA/glossary.htm


Refers to the ability of a program or device to imitate another program or device. Many printers, for example, are designed to emulate Hewlett-Packard LaserJet printers because so much software is written for HP printers. By emulating an HP printer, a printer can work with any software written for a real HP printer. Emulation tricks the software into believing that a device is really some other device. Communications software packages often include terminal emulation drivers. This enables your PC to emulate a particular type of terminal so that you can log on to a mainframe. It is also possible for a computer to emulate another type of computer. For example, there are programs that enable an Apple Macintosh to emulate a PC.
www.5starsupport.com/info/glossary.htm


The process by which a device is built to work like another. For example, a chip can be designed to emulate another model and execute software that was written to run in the other design. The emulator can be hardware, software or both.
www.synopsys.com/news/pr_kit/eda_glossary.html


A process by which a computer imitates the actions of another computer, so that the imitating system accepts the same data and executes the same computer programs as the imitated system.
ccs.uchicago.edu/technotes/misc/Glossary/gloss2.html


behavior like another type of entity, usually as in "terminal emulation." Terminal emulation software such as Kermit, ZTerm or ProComm allows a desktop computer to emulate (act like, display data from, interactively log in to) a terminal on a multi-user server-computer in a remote location, over phone lines via modems at both ends, or via hardwiring.
cai.ucdavis.edu/instruction/netgloss.htm


The process of imitation (simulation) of one computer system by another. The imitating program, or device (emulator), accepts the same data, executes the same programs, and achieves the same results.
www.nuhorizons.com/Glossary/ComputerConcepts.html


A DIGITAL PRESERVATION STRATEGY whereby digital materials are stored in their original format as a bit stream and software and hardware emulators are employed to mimic the behaviour of obsolete hardware platforms and emulate the relevant operating system to allow for access.
www.leeds.ac.uk/cedars/documents/PSW01.htm


The imitation, performed by a combination of hardware and software, of all or part of one device, terminal, or computer by another, so that the imitating device accepts the same data, performs the same functions, and appears to other network devices as if it were the imitated device. Emulation allows programs to run between incompatible systems.
www.oregoninnovation.org/pressroom/glossary.d-f.html


Replication of a computing system to process programs and data from an early system that is no longer available.
www.cs.cornell.edu/wya/DigLib/MS1999/glossary.html


In mainframe computing, software that allows a PC workstation to "imitate" or perform as a mainframe terminal.
www.aits.uillinois.edu/glossary/glossarye.html


A means of overcoming technological obsolescence of hardware and software by developing techniques for imitating obsolete systems on future generations of computers.
www.dpconline.org/graphics/intro/definitions.html


Emulation is said to happen when a system, or a program, performs in the same way as another system. A computer can emulate another type of computer in order to run its programs. Sometimes terminal emulation is necessary in order for one computer to make a network connection with another.
www.aot.state.vt.us/CaddHelp/cadd/glossary/gloss_e.htm


A way to allow software to run on a processor it was not designed for. When you run an application written for a 68K processor (such as the Quandra) on a Power Mac (which has a PowerPC chip), it runs in emulation mode (which is slower than native code would be). Emulation mode requires an emulator, a piece of software that imitates the native processor. For example, the Power Macs have a 68LC040 emulator built into their ROM chips and can come with SoftWindows, an emulator that lets you run PC progams. Compare native.
www.lcmug.com/glossary_E.htm


The use of special control programs to make a new computer system "act" like an older one, thus enabling a business to execute its older programs while software conversion takes place.
www.indstate.edu/cape/glossary.html


To get a clear idea of exactly what Emulation is, you must first have a clear understanding of what the word "emulation" means. Quite simply put, emulation is the act of imitating another. You could say, for example, that a stunt double is "emulating" the real actor in the movie for certain shots. While the double may not actually be the actor, he does mirror him very closely. Software looks and acts just like the H card, and can actually convince the receiver that it is indeed a valid H card. The important idea, however, is that if DirecTV ever sends down some sort of killer attack, it is just the software on a cheap floppy disk that could be potentially damaged as opposed to an expensive H Card. This is why emulation is so attractive to DirecTV hackers.
www.dssmafia.com/dictionary.php


(1) The use of programming techniques and special machine features to permit a computing system to run programs written for another system.
www-3.ibm.com/software/network/commserver/library/publications/csaix_60/dyyl1m05.htm


The imitation of all or part of one device, terminal, or computer by another, so that the imitating device accepts the same data, performs the same functions, & appears to other network devices as if it were the imitated devices.
www.connectworld.net/iec/Browse02/GLSE.html


– The imitation of a computer system, performed by a combination of hardware and software, that allows programs to run between incompatible systems.
www.liquorstorepos.com/html/Glossary.htm


Using software which makes a PC behave as though it were a terminal, or which alters the characteristics of a user's terminal to act as a different type of terminal.
www.uic.edu/depts/accc/inform/v106d.html


The imitation by one computing device or program of another device or program. This allows the client and the server to conduct transparent access to networked resources. VT100 is one of the most common telecommunications emulations.
www.ala.org/rusa/mars/glossary.html


Software that you load on an Apple Mac computer to make it work like a PC operating system so Windows applications can be run.
www.ephotozine.com/glossary/index.cfm


Recreation of a system that will behave just like an original computing environment based on detailed specifications of that environment. [Arms, 2001, p. 260.]
digitalib.geometaphors.com/west/glossary/


A network activity in which a computer acts as if it is another kind of computer or terminal. An example is when a Macintosh user opens a remote terminal session to a VAX, it may run a program that emulates a DEC VT240 terminal.
www.zocalo.net/tng/glossary/glos_e.html


Hardware or software, or a combination of the two, that behaves like another device or program, like PCs emulating dumb terminals.
www.acc-net.com/Kahuna/glossaryE.htm


A technique that allows a piece of software or hardware to ‘act’ like another in order to cooperate with otherwise incompatible products. A very common use of emulation is using a printer with certain types of software.
www.visionsofadonai.com/onrampglossary2.html


ambition to equal or excel
www.cogsci.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/webwn


(computer science) technique of one machine obtaining the same results as another
www.cogsci.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/webwn


effort to equal or surpass another
www.cogsci.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/webwn




There for a GBA cannot emulate itself.

:p  :p  :p  we'll be on page2 in no time
LOL :lol:
doesnt anyone else think this is taking up valuable space, what with all the quotes.
 
Last edited by a moderator:

Vimacs

Don't be evil!
Joined
Oct 23, 2003
Messages
5,762
Age
33
Location
Germany
Website
Visit site
PAUL103DOGS posted on Oct 22 2004 at 08:27 PM said:
sam fisher posted on Oct 22 2004 at 05:10 PM said:
pAiN posted on Oct 22 2004 at 06:09 PM said:
Good job Sam.. top notch explanations.   *emulates Sam Fisher*

thats not emulation. Here is a definition of emulation:

Definitions of EMULATION on the Web:

The imitation of a computer system, performed by a combination of hardware and software, that allows programs to run between incompatible systems.
www.rvcomp.com/wiring/EIA/glossary.htm


Refers to the ability of a program or device to imitate another program or device. Many printers, for example, are designed to emulate Hewlett-Packard LaserJet printers because so much software is written for HP printers. By emulating an HP printer, a printer can work with any software written for a real HP printer. Emulation tricks the software into believing that a device is really some other device. Communications software packages often include terminal emulation drivers. This enables your PC to emulate a particular type of terminal so that you can log on to a mainframe. It is also possible for a computer to emulate another type of computer. For example, there are programs that enable an Apple Macintosh to emulate a PC.
www.5starsupport.com/info/glossary.htm


The process by which a device is built to work like another. For example, a chip can be designed to emulate another model and execute software that was written to run in the other design. The emulator can be hardware, software or both.
www.synopsys.com/news/pr_kit/eda_glossary.html


A process by which a computer imitates the actions of another computer, so that the imitating system accepts the same data and executes the same computer programs as the imitated system.
ccs.uchicago.edu/technotes/misc/Glossary/gloss2.html


behavior like another type of entity, usually as in "terminal emulation." Terminal emulation software such as Kermit, ZTerm or ProComm allows a desktop computer to emulate (act like, display data from, interactively log in to) a terminal on a multi-user server-computer in a remote location, over phone lines via modems at both ends, or via hardwiring.
cai.ucdavis.edu/instruction/netgloss.htm


The process of imitation (simulation) of one computer system by another. The imitating program, or device (emulator), accepts the same data, executes the same programs, and achieves the same results.
www.nuhorizons.com/Glossary/ComputerConcepts.html


A DIGITAL PRESERVATION STRATEGY whereby digital materials are stored in their original format as a bit stream and software and hardware emulators are employed to mimic the behaviour of obsolete hardware platforms and emulate the relevant operating system to allow for access.
www.leeds.ac.uk/cedars/documents/PSW01.htm


The imitation, performed by a combination of hardware and software, of all or part of one device, terminal, or computer by another, so that the imitating device accepts the same data, performs the same functions, and appears to other network devices as if it were the imitated device. Emulation allows programs to run between incompatible systems.
www.oregoninnovation.org/pressroom/glossary.d-f.html


Replication of a computing system to process programs and data from an early system that is no longer available.
www.cs.cornell.edu/wya/DigLib/MS1999/glossary.html


In mainframe computing, software that allows a PC workstation to "imitate" or perform as a mainframe terminal.
www.aits.uillinois.edu/glossary/glossarye.html


A means of overcoming technological obsolescence of hardware and software by developing techniques for imitating obsolete systems on future generations of computers.
www.dpconline.org/graphics/intro/definitions.html


Emulation is said to happen when a system, or a program, performs in the same way as another system. A computer can emulate another type of computer in order to run its programs. Sometimes terminal emulation is necessary in order for one computer to make a network connection with another.
www.aot.state.vt.us/CaddHelp/cadd/glossary/gloss_e.htm


A way to allow software to run on a processor it was not designed for. When you run an application written for a 68K processor (such as the Quandra) on a Power Mac (which has a PowerPC chip), it runs in emulation mode (which is slower than native code would be). Emulation mode requires an emulator, a piece of software that imitates the native processor. For example, the Power Macs have a 68LC040 emulator built into their ROM chips and can come with SoftWindows, an emulator that lets you run PC progams. Compare native.
www.lcmug.com/glossary_E.htm


The use of special control programs to make a new computer system "act" like an older one, thus enabling a business to execute its older programs while software conversion takes place.
www.indstate.edu/cape/glossary.html


To get a clear idea of exactly what Emulation is, you must first have a clear understanding of what the word "emulation" means. Quite simply put, emulation is the act of imitating another. You could say, for example, that a stunt double is "emulating" the real actor in the movie for certain shots. While the double may not actually be the actor, he does mirror him very closely. Software looks and acts just like the H card, and can actually convince the receiver that it is indeed a valid H card. The important idea, however, is that if DirecTV ever sends down some sort of killer attack, it is just the software on a cheap floppy disk that could be potentially damaged as opposed to an expensive H Card. This is why emulation is so attractive to DirecTV hackers.
www.dssmafia.com/dictionary.php


(1) The use of programming techniques and special machine features to permit a computing system to run programs written for another system.
www-3.ibm.com/software/network/commserver/library/publications/csaix_60/dyyl1m05.htm


The imitation of all or part of one device, terminal, or computer by another, so that the imitating device accepts the same data, performs the same functions, & appears to other network devices as if it were the imitated devices.
www.connectworld.net/iec/Browse02/GLSE.html


– The imitation of a computer system, performed by a combination of hardware and software, that allows programs to run between incompatible systems.
www.liquorstorepos.com/html/Glossary.htm


Using software which makes a PC behave as though it were a terminal, or which alters the characteristics of a user's terminal to act as a different type of terminal.
www.uic.edu/depts/accc/inform/v106d.html


The imitation by one computing device or program of another device or program. This allows the client and the server to conduct transparent access to networked resources. VT100 is one of the most common telecommunications emulations.
www.ala.org/rusa/mars/glossary.html


Software that you load on an Apple Mac computer to make it work like a PC operating system so Windows applications can be run.
www.ephotozine.com/glossary/index.cfm


Recreation of a system that will behave just like an original computing environment based on detailed specifications of that environment. [Arms, 2001, p. 260.]
digitalib.geometaphors.com/west/glossary/


A network activity in which a computer acts as if it is another kind of computer or terminal. An example is when a Macintosh user opens a remote terminal session to a VAX, it may run a program that emulates a DEC VT240 terminal.
www.zocalo.net/tng/glossary/glos_e.html


Hardware or software, or a combination of the two, that behaves like another device or program, like PCs emulating dumb terminals.
www.acc-net.com/Kahuna/glossaryE.htm


A technique that allows a piece of software or hardware to ‘act’ like another in order to cooperate with otherwise incompatible products. A very common use of emulation is using a printer with certain types of software.
www.visionsofadonai.com/onrampglossary2.html


ambition to equal or excel
www.cogsci.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/webwn


(computer science) technique of one machine obtaining the same results as another
www.cogsci.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/webwn


effort to equal or surpass another
www.cogsci.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/webwn




There for a GBA cannot emulate itself.

:p  :p  :p  we'll be on page2 in no time
LOL :lol:
doesnt anyone else think this is taking up valuable space, what with all the quotes.
maybe
 
Last edited by a moderator:

falken80

Certified Guru
Joined
Oct 15, 2003
Messages
452
Vimacs posted on Oct 22 2004 at 06:35 PM said:
PAUL103DOGS posted on Oct 22 2004 at 08:27 PM said:
sam fisher posted on Oct 22 2004 at 05:10 PM said:
pAiN posted on Oct 22 2004 at 06:09 PM said:
Good job Sam.. top notch explanations.   *emulates Sam Fisher*

thats not emulation. Here is a definition of emulation:

Definitions of EMULATION on the Web:

The imitation of a computer system, performed by a combination of hardware and software, that allows programs to run between incompatible systems.
www.rvcomp.com/wiring/EIA/glossary.htm


Refers to the ability of a program or device to imitate another program or device. Many printers, for example, are designed to emulate Hewlett-Packard LaserJet printers because so much software is written for HP printers. By emulating an HP printer, a printer can work with any software written for a real HP printer. Emulation tricks the software into believing that a device is really some other device. Communications software packages often include terminal emulation drivers. This enables your PC to emulate a particular type of terminal so that you can log on to a mainframe. It is also possible for a computer to emulate another type of computer. For example, there are programs that enable an Apple Macintosh to emulate a PC.
www.5starsupport.com/info/glossary.htm


The process by which a device is built to work like another. For example, a chip can be designed to emulate another model and execute software that was written to run in the other design. The emulator can be hardware, software or both.
www.synopsys.com/news/pr_kit/eda_glossary.html


A process by which a computer imitates the actions of another computer, so that the imitating system accepts the same data and executes the same computer programs as the imitated system.
ccs.uchicago.edu/technotes/misc/Glossary/gloss2.html


behavior like another type of entity, usually as in "terminal emulation." Terminal emulation software such as Kermit, ZTerm or ProComm allows a desktop computer to emulate (act like, display data from, interactively log in to) a terminal on a multi-user server-computer in a remote location, over phone lines via modems at both ends, or via hardwiring.
cai.ucdavis.edu/instruction/netgloss.htm


The process of imitation (simulation) of one computer system by another. The imitating program, or device (emulator), accepts the same data, executes the same programs, and achieves the same results.
www.nuhorizons.com/Glossary/ComputerConcepts.html


A DIGITAL PRESERVATION STRATEGY whereby digital materials are stored in their original format as a bit stream and software and hardware emulators are employed to mimic the behaviour of obsolete hardware platforms and emulate the relevant operating system to allow for access.
www.leeds.ac.uk/cedars/documents/PSW01.htm


The imitation, performed by a combination of hardware and software, of all or part of one device, terminal, or computer by another, so that the imitating device accepts the same data, performs the same functions, and appears to other network devices as if it were the imitated device. Emulation allows programs to run between incompatible systems.
www.oregoninnovation.org/pressroom/glossary.d-f.html


Replication of a computing system to process programs and data from an early system that is no longer available.
www.cs.cornell.edu/wya/DigLib/MS1999/glossary.html


In mainframe computing, software that allows a PC workstation to "imitate" or perform as a mainframe terminal.
www.aits.uillinois.edu/glossary/glossarye.html


A means of overcoming technological obsolescence of hardware and software by developing techniques for imitating obsolete systems on future generations of computers.
www.dpconline.org/graphics/intro/definitions.html


Emulation is said to happen when a system, or a program, performs in the same way as another system. A computer can emulate another type of computer in order to run its programs. Sometimes terminal emulation is necessary in order for one computer to make a network connection with another.
www.aot.state.vt.us/CaddHelp/cadd/glossary/gloss_e.htm


A way to allow software to run on a processor it was not designed for. When you run an application written for a 68K processor (such as the Quandra) on a Power Mac (which has a PowerPC chip), it runs in emulation mode (which is slower than native code would be). Emulation mode requires an emulator, a piece of software that imitates the native processor. For example, the Power Macs have a 68LC040 emulator built into their ROM chips and can come with SoftWindows, an emulator that lets you run PC progams. Compare native.
www.lcmug.com/glossary_E.htm


The use of special control programs to make a new computer system "act" like an older one, thus enabling a business to execute its older programs while software conversion takes place.
www.indstate.edu/cape/glossary.html


To get a clear idea of exactly what Emulation is, you must first have a clear understanding of what the word "emulation" means. Quite simply put, emulation is the act of imitating another. You could say, for example, that a stunt double is "emulating" the real actor in the movie for certain shots. While the double may not actually be the actor, he does mirror him very closely. Software looks and acts just like the H card, and can actually convince the receiver that it is indeed a valid H card. The important idea, however, is that if DirecTV ever sends down some sort of killer attack, it is just the software on a cheap floppy disk that could be potentially damaged as opposed to an expensive H Card. This is why emulation is so attractive to DirecTV hackers.
www.dssmafia.com/dictionary.php


(1) The use of programming techniques and special machine features to permit a computing system to run programs written for another system.
www-3.ibm.com/software/network/commserver/library/publications/csaix_60/dyyl1m05.htm


The imitation of all or part of one device, terminal, or computer by another, so that the imitating device accepts the same data, performs the same functions, & appears to other network devices as if it were the imitated devices.
www.connectworld.net/iec/Browse02/GLSE.html


– The imitation of a computer system, performed by a combination of hardware and software, that allows programs to run between incompatible systems.
www.liquorstorepos.com/html/Glossary.htm


Using software which makes a PC behave as though it were a terminal, or which alters the characteristics of a user's terminal to act as a different type of terminal.
www.uic.edu/depts/accc/inform/v106d.html


The imitation by one computing device or program of another device or program. This allows the client and the server to conduct transparent access to networked resources. VT100 is one of the most common telecommunications emulations.
www.ala.org/rusa/mars/glossary.html


Software that you load on an Apple Mac computer to make it work like a PC operating system so Windows applications can be run.
www.ephotozine.com/glossary/index.cfm


Recreation of a system that will behave just like an original computing environment based on detailed specifications of that environment. [Arms, 2001, p. 260.]
digitalib.geometaphors.com/west/glossary/


A network activity in which a computer acts as if it is another kind of computer or terminal. An example is when a Macintosh user opens a remote terminal session to a VAX, it may run a program that emulates a DEC VT240 terminal.
www.zocalo.net/tng/glossary/glos_e.html


Hardware or software, or a combination of the two, that behaves like another device or program, like PCs emulating dumb terminals.
www.acc-net.com/Kahuna/glossaryE.htm


A technique that allows a piece of software or hardware to ‘act’ like another in order to cooperate with otherwise incompatible products. A very common use of emulation is using a printer with certain types of software.
www.visionsofadonai.com/onrampglossary2.html


ambition to equal or excel
www.cogsci.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/webwn


(computer science) technique of one machine obtaining the same results as another
www.cogsci.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/webwn


effort to equal or surpass another
www.cogsci.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/webwn




There for a GBA cannot emulate itself.

:p  :p  :p  we'll be on page2 in no time
LOL :lol:
doesnt anyone else think this is taking up valuable space, what with all the quotes.
maybe
maybe not
 
Last edited by a moderator:

Yuglooc

Go Go Igo!
Joined
Jul 11, 2004
Messages
548
Website
Visit site
falken80 posted on Oct 22 2004 at 07:02 PM said:
Vimacs posted on Oct 22 2004 at 06:35 PM said:
PAUL103DOGS posted on Oct 22 2004 at 08:27 PM said:
sam fisher posted on Oct 22 2004 at 05:10 PM said:
pAiN posted on Oct 22 2004 at 06:09 PM said:
Good job Sam.. top notch explanations.   *emulates Sam Fisher*

thats not emulation. Here is a definition of emulation:

Definitions of EMULATION on the Web:

The imitation of a computer system, performed by a combination of hardware and software, that allows programs to run between incompatible systems.
www.rvcomp.com/wiring/EIA/glossary.htm


Refers to the ability of a program or device to imitate another program or device. Many printers, for example, are designed to emulate Hewlett-Packard LaserJet printers because so much software is written for HP printers. By emulating an HP printer, a printer can work with any software written for a real HP printer. Emulation tricks the software into believing that a device is really some other device. Communications software packages often include terminal emulation drivers. This enables your PC to emulate a particular type of terminal so that you can log on to a mainframe. It is also possible for a computer to emulate another type of computer. For example, there are programs that enable an Apple Macintosh to emulate a PC.
www.5starsupport.com/info/glossary.htm


The process by which a device is built to work like another. For example, a chip can be designed to emulate another model and execute software that was written to run in the other design. The emulator can be hardware, software or both.
www.synopsys.com/news/pr_kit/eda_glossary.html


A process by which a computer imitates the actions of another computer, so that the imitating system accepts the same data and executes the same computer programs as the imitated system.
ccs.uchicago.edu/technotes/misc/Glossary/gloss2.html


behavior like another type of entity, usually as in "terminal emulation." Terminal emulation software such as Kermit, ZTerm or ProComm allows a desktop computer to emulate (act like, display data from, interactively log in to) a terminal on a multi-user server-computer in a remote location, over phone lines via modems at both ends, or via hardwiring.
cai.ucdavis.edu/instruction/netgloss.htm


The process of imitation (simulation) of one computer system by another. The imitating program, or device (emulator), accepts the same data, executes the same programs, and achieves the same results.
www.nuhorizons.com/Glossary/ComputerConcepts.html


A DIGITAL PRESERVATION STRATEGY whereby digital materials are stored in their original format as a bit stream and software and hardware emulators are employed to mimic the behaviour of obsolete hardware platforms and emulate the relevant operating system to allow for access.
www.leeds.ac.uk/cedars/documents/PSW01.htm


The imitation, performed by a combination of hardware and software, of all or part of one device, terminal, or computer by another, so that the imitating device accepts the same data, performs the same functions, and appears to other network devices as if it were the imitated device. Emulation allows programs to run between incompatible systems.
www.oregoninnovation.org/pressroom/glossary.d-f.html


Replication of a computing system to process programs and data from an early system that is no longer available.
www.cs.cornell.edu/wya/DigLib/MS1999/glossary.html


In mainframe computing, software that allows a PC workstation to "imitate" or perform as a mainframe terminal.
www.aits.uillinois.edu/glossary/glossarye.html


A means of overcoming technological obsolescence of hardware and software by developing techniques for imitating obsolete systems on future generations of computers.
www.dpconline.org/graphics/intro/definitions.html


Emulation is said to happen when a system, or a program, performs in the same way as another system. A computer can emulate another type of computer in order to run its programs. Sometimes terminal emulation is necessary in order for one computer to make a network connection with another.
www.aot.state.vt.us/CaddHelp/cadd/glossary/gloss_e.htm


A way to allow software to run on a processor it was not designed for. When you run an application written for a 68K processor (such as the Quandra) on a Power Mac (which has a PowerPC chip), it runs in emulation mode (which is slower than native code would be). Emulation mode requires an emulator, a piece of software that imitates the native processor. For example, the Power Macs have a 68LC040 emulator built into their ROM chips and can come with SoftWindows, an emulator that lets you run PC progams. Compare native.
www.lcmug.com/glossary_E.htm


The use of special control programs to make a new computer system "act" like an older one, thus enabling a business to execute its older programs while software conversion takes place.
www.indstate.edu/cape/glossary.html


To get a clear idea of exactly what Emulation is, you must first have a clear understanding of what the word "emulation" means. Quite simply put, emulation is the act of imitating another. You could say, for example, that a stunt double is "emulating" the real actor in the movie for certain shots. While the double may not actually be the actor, he does mirror him very closely. Software looks and acts just like the H card, and can actually convince the receiver that it is indeed a valid H card. The important idea, however, is that if DirecTV ever sends down some sort of killer attack, it is just the software on a cheap floppy disk that could be potentially damaged as opposed to an expensive H Card. This is why emulation is so attractive to DirecTV hackers.
www.dssmafia.com/dictionary.php


(1) The use of programming techniques and special machine features to permit a computing system to run programs written for another system.
www-3.ibm.com/software/network/commserver/library/publications/csaix_60/dyyl1m05.htm


The imitation of all or part of one device, terminal, or computer by another, so that the imitating device accepts the same data, performs the same functions, & appears to other network devices as if it were the imitated devices.
www.connectworld.net/iec/Browse02/GLSE.html


– The imitation of a computer system, performed by a combination of hardware and software, that allows programs to run between incompatible systems.
www.liquorstorepos.com/html/Glossary.htm


Using software which makes a PC behave as though it were a terminal, or which alters the characteristics of a user's terminal to act as a different type of terminal.
www.uic.edu/depts/accc/inform/v106d.html


The imitation by one computing device or program of another device or program. This allows the client and the server to conduct transparent access to networked resources. VT100 is one of the most common telecommunications emulations.
www.ala.org/rusa/mars/glossary.html


Software that you load on an Apple Mac computer to make it work like a PC operating system so Windows applications can be run.
www.ephotozine.com/glossary/index.cfm


Recreation of a system that will behave just like an original computing environment based on detailed specifications of that environment. [Arms, 2001, p. 260.]
digitalib.geometaphors.com/west/glossary/


A network activity in which a computer acts as if it is another kind of computer or terminal. An example is when a Macintosh user opens a remote terminal session to a VAX, it may run a program that emulates a DEC VT240 terminal.
www.zocalo.net/tng/glossary/glos_e.html


Hardware or software, or a combination of the two, that behaves like another device or program, like PCs emulating dumb terminals.
www.acc-net.com/Kahuna/glossaryE.htm


A technique that allows a piece of software or hardware to ‘act’ like another in order to cooperate with otherwise incompatible products. A very common use of emulation is using a printer with certain types of software.
www.visionsofadonai.com/onrampglossary2.html


ambition to equal or excel
www.cogsci.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/webwn


(computer science) technique of one machine obtaining the same results as another
www.cogsci.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/webwn


effort to equal or surpass another
www.cogsci.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/webwn




There for a GBA cannot emulate itself.

:p  :p  :p  we'll be on page2 in no time
LOL :lol:
doesnt anyone else think this is taking up valuable space, what with all the quotes.
maybe
maybe not
Not really valuable space. Is this getting loled soon you think?
 
Last edited by a moderator:

taras

Mega Pandora mania
Joined
Jun 17, 2003
Messages
934
Location
Scotland
Website
taras.net
Yuglooc posted on Oct 22 2004 at 07:08 PM said:
falken80 posted on Oct 22 2004 at 07:02 PM said:
Vimacs posted on Oct 22 2004 at 06:35 PM said:
PAUL103DOGS posted on Oct 22 2004 at 08:27 PM said:
sam fisher posted on Oct 22 2004 at 05:10 PM said:
pAiN posted on Oct 22 2004 at 06:09 PM said:
Good job Sam.. top notch explanations.   *emulates Sam Fisher*

thats not emulation. Here is a definition of emulation:

Definitions of EMULATION on the Web:

The imitation of a computer system, performed by a combination of hardware and software, that allows programs to run between incompatible systems.
www.rvcomp.com/wiring/EIA/glossary.htm


Refers to the ability of a program or device to imitate another program or device. Many printers, for example, are designed to emulate Hewlett-Packard LaserJet printers because so much software is written for HP printers. By emulating an HP printer, a printer can work with any software written for a real HP printer. Emulation tricks the software into believing that a device is really some other device. Communications software packages often include terminal emulation drivers. This enables your PC to emulate a particular type of terminal so that you can log on to a mainframe. It is also possible for a computer to emulate another type of computer. For example, there are programs that enable an Apple Macintosh to emulate a PC.
www.5starsupport.com/info/glossary.htm


The process by which a device is built to work like another. For example, a chip can be designed to emulate another model and execute software that was written to run in the other design. The emulator can be hardware, software or both.
www.synopsys.com/news/pr_kit/eda_glossary.html


A process by which a computer imitates the actions of another computer, so that the imitating system accepts the same data and executes the same computer programs as the imitated system.
ccs.uchicago.edu/technotes/misc/Glossary/gloss2.html


behavior like another type of entity, usually as in "terminal emulation." Terminal emulation software such as Kermit, ZTerm or ProComm allows a desktop computer to emulate (act like, display data from, interactively log in to) a terminal on a multi-user server-computer in a remote location, over phone lines via modems at both ends, or via hardwiring.
cai.ucdavis.edu/instruction/netgloss.htm


The process of imitation (simulation) of one computer system by another. The imitating program, or device (emulator), accepts the same data, executes the same programs, and achieves the same results.
www.nuhorizons.com/Glossary/ComputerConcepts.html


A DIGITAL PRESERVATION STRATEGY whereby digital materials are stored in their original format as a bit stream and software and hardware emulators are employed to mimic the behaviour of obsolete hardware platforms and emulate the relevant operating system to allow for access.
www.leeds.ac.uk/cedars/documents/PSW01.htm


The imitation, performed by a combination of hardware and software, of all or part of one device, terminal, or computer by another, so that the imitating device accepts the same data, performs the same functions, and appears to other network devices as if it were the imitated device. Emulation allows programs to run between incompatible systems.
www.oregoninnovation.org/pressroom/glossary.d-f.html


Replication of a computing system to process programs and data from an early system that is no longer available.
www.cs.cornell.edu/wya/DigLib/MS1999/glossary.html


In mainframe computing, software that allows a PC workstation to "imitate" or perform as a mainframe terminal.
www.aits.uillinois.edu/glossary/glossarye.html


A means of overcoming technological obsolescence of hardware and software by developing techniques for imitating obsolete systems on future generations of computers.
www.dpconline.org/graphics/intro/definitions.html


Emulation is said to happen when a system, or a program, performs in the same way as another system. A computer can emulate another type of computer in order to run its programs. Sometimes terminal emulation is necessary in order for one computer to make a network connection with another.
www.aot.state.vt.us/CaddHelp/cadd/glossary/gloss_e.htm


A way to allow software to run on a processor it was not designed for. When you run an application written for a 68K processor (such as the Quandra) on a Power Mac (which has a PowerPC chip), it runs in emulation mode (which is slower than native code would be). Emulation mode requires an emulator, a piece of software that imitates the native processor. For example, the Power Macs have a 68LC040 emulator built into their ROM chips and can come with SoftWindows, an emulator that lets you run PC progams. Compare native.
www.lcmug.com/glossary_E.htm


The use of special control programs to make a new computer system "act" like an older one, thus enabling a business to execute its older programs while software conversion takes place.
www.indstate.edu/cape/glossary.html


To get a clear idea of exactly what Emulation is, you must first have a clear understanding of what the word "emulation" means. Quite simply put, emulation is the act of imitating another. You could say, for example, that a stunt double is "emulating" the real actor in the movie for certain shots. While the double may not actually be the actor, he does mirror him very closely. Software looks and acts just like the H card, and can actually convince the receiver that it is indeed a valid H card. The important idea, however, is that if DirecTV ever sends down some sort of killer attack, it is just the software on a cheap floppy disk that could be potentially damaged as opposed to an expensive H Card. This is why emulation is so attractive to DirecTV hackers.
www.dssmafia.com/dictionary.php


(1) The use of programming techniques and special machine features to permit a computing system to run programs written for another system.
www-3.ibm.com/software/network/commserver/library/publications/csaix_60/dyyl1m05.htm


The imitation of all or part of one device, terminal, or computer by another, so that the imitating device accepts the same data, performs the same functions, & appears to other network devices as if it were the imitated devices.
www.connectworld.net/iec/Browse02/GLSE.html


– The imitation of a computer system, performed by a combination of hardware and software, that allows programs to run between incompatible systems.
www.liquorstorepos.com/html/Glossary.htm


Using software which makes a PC behave as though it were a terminal, or which alters the characteristics of a user's terminal to act as a different type of terminal.
www.uic.edu/depts/accc/inform/v106d.html


The imitation by one computing device or program of another device or program. This allows the client and the server to conduct transparent access to networked resources. VT100 is one of the most common telecommunications emulations.
www.ala.org/rusa/mars/glossary.html


Software that you load on an Apple Mac computer to make it work like a PC operating system so Windows applications can be run.
www.ephotozine.com/glossary/index.cfm


Recreation of a system that will behave just like an original computing environment based on detailed specifications of that environment. [Arms, 2001, p. 260.]
digitalib.geometaphors.com/west/glossary/


A network activity in which a computer acts as if it is another kind of computer or terminal. An example is when a Macintosh user opens a remote terminal session to a VAX, it may run a program that emulates a DEC VT240 terminal.
www.zocalo.net/tng/glossary/glos_e.html


Hardware or software, or a combination of the two, that behaves like another device or program, like PCs emulating dumb terminals.
www.acc-net.com/Kahuna/glossaryE.htm


A technique that allows a piece of software or hardware to ‘act’ like another in order to cooperate with otherwise incompatible products. A very common use of emulation is using a printer with certain types of software.
www.visionsofadonai.com/onrampglossary2.html


ambition to equal or excel
www.cogsci.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/webwn


(computer science) technique of one machine obtaining the same results as another
www.cogsci.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/webwn


effort to equal or surpass another
www.cogsci.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/webwn




There for a GBA cannot emulate itself.

:p  :p  :p  we'll be on page2 in no time
LOL :lol:
doesnt anyone else think this is taking up valuable space, what with all the quotes.
maybe
maybe not
Not really valuable space. Is this getting loled soon you think?
No, because it's not funny.

Actually, yes, for the same reason.
 
Last edited by a moderator:
P

pAiN

Guest
taras posted on Oct 22 2004 at 02:31 PM said:
Yuglooc posted on Oct 22 2004 at 07:08 PM said:
falken80 posted on Oct 22 2004 at 07:02 PM said:
Vimacs posted on Oct 22 2004 at 06:35 PM said:
PAUL103DOGS posted on Oct 22 2004 at 08:27 PM said:
sam fisher posted on Oct 22 2004 at 05:10 PM said:
pAiN posted on Oct 22 2004 at 06:09 PM said:
Good job Sam.. top notch explanations.   *emulates Sam Fisher*

thats not emulation. Here is a definition of emulation:

Definitions of EMULATION on the Web:

The imitation of a computer system, performed by a combination of hardware and software, that allows programs to run between incompatible systems.
www.rvcomp.com/wiring/EIA/glossary.htm


Refers to the ability of a program or device to imitate another program or device. Many printers, for example, are designed to emulate Hewlett-Packard LaserJet printers because so much software is written for HP printers. By emulating an HP printer, a printer can work with any software written for a real HP printer. Emulation tricks the software into believing that a device is really some other device. Communications software packages often include terminal emulation drivers. This enables your PC to emulate a particular type of terminal so that you can log on to a mainframe. It is also possible for a computer to emulate another type of computer. For example, there are programs that enable an Apple Macintosh to emulate a PC.
www.5starsupport.com/info/glossary.htm


The process by which a device is built to work like another. For example, a chip can be designed to emulate another model and execute software that was written to run in the other design. The emulator can be hardware, software or both.
www.synopsys.com/news/pr_kit/eda_glossary.html


A process by which a computer imitates the actions of another computer, so that the imitating system accepts the same data and executes the same computer programs as the imitated system.
ccs.uchicago.edu/technotes/misc/Glossary/gloss2.html


behavior like another type of entity, usually as in "terminal emulation." Terminal emulation software such as Kermit, ZTerm or ProComm allows a desktop computer to emulate (act like, display data from, interactively log in to) a terminal on a multi-user server-computer in a remote location, over phone lines via modems at both ends, or via hardwiring.
cai.ucdavis.edu/instruction/netgloss.htm


The process of imitation (simulation) of one computer system by another. The imitating program, or device (emulator), accepts the same data, executes the same programs, and achieves the same results.
www.nuhorizons.com/Glossary/ComputerConcepts.html


A DIGITAL PRESERVATION STRATEGY whereby digital materials are stored in their original format as a bit stream and software and hardware emulators are employed to mimic the behaviour of obsolete hardware platforms and emulate the relevant operating system to allow for access.
www.leeds.ac.uk/cedars/documents/PSW01.htm


The imitation, performed by a combination of hardware and software, of all or part of one device, terminal, or computer by another, so that the imitating device accepts the same data, performs the same functions, and appears to other network devices as if it were the imitated device. Emulation allows programs to run between incompatible systems.
www.oregoninnovation.org/pressroom/glossary.d-f.html


Replication of a computing system to process programs and data from an early system that is no longer available.
www.cs.cornell.edu/wya/DigLib/MS1999/glossary.html


In mainframe computing, software that allows a PC workstation to "imitate" or perform as a mainframe terminal.
www.aits.uillinois.edu/glossary/glossarye.html


A means of overcoming technological obsolescence of hardware and software by developing techniques for imitating obsolete systems on future generations of computers.
www.dpconline.org/graphics/intro/definitions.html


Emulation is said to happen when a system, or a program, performs in the same way as another system. A computer can emulate another type of computer in order to run its programs. Sometimes terminal emulation is necessary in order for one computer to make a network connection with another.
www.aot.state.vt.us/CaddHelp/cadd/glossary/gloss_e.htm


A way to allow software to run on a processor it was not designed for. When you run an application written for a 68K processor (such as the Quandra) on a Power Mac (which has a PowerPC chip), it runs in emulation mode (which is slower than native code would be). Emulation mode requires an emulator, a piece of software that imitates the native processor. For example, the Power Macs have a 68LC040 emulator built into their ROM chips and can come with SoftWindows, an emulator that lets you run PC progams. Compare native.
www.lcmug.com/glossary_E.htm


The use of special control programs to make a new computer system "act" like an older one, thus enabling a business to execute its older programs while software conversion takes place.
www.indstate.edu/cape/glossary.html


To get a clear idea of exactly what Emulation is, you must first have a clear understanding of what the word "emulation" means. Quite simply put, emulation is the act of imitating another. You could say, for example, that a stunt double is "emulating" the real actor in the movie for certain shots. While the double may not actually be the actor, he does mirror him very closely. Software looks and acts just like the H card, and can actually convince the receiver that it is indeed a valid H card. The important idea, however, is that if DirecTV ever sends down some sort of killer attack, it is just the software on a cheap floppy disk that could be potentially damaged as opposed to an expensive H Card. This is why emulation is so attractive to DirecTV hackers.
www.dssmafia.com/dictionary.php


(1) The use of programming techniques and special machine features to permit a computing system to run programs written for another system.
www-3.ibm.com/software/network/commserver/library/publications/csaix_60/dyyl1m05.htm


The imitation of all or part of one device, terminal, or computer by another, so that the imitating device accepts the same data, performs the same functions, & appears to other network devices as if it were the imitated devices.
www.connectworld.net/iec/Browse02/GLSE.html


– The imitation of a computer system, performed by a combination of hardware and software, that allows programs to run between incompatible systems.
www.liquorstorepos.com/html/Glossary.htm


Using software which makes a PC behave as though it were a terminal, or which alters the characteristics of a user's terminal to act as a different type of terminal.
www.uic.edu/depts/accc/inform/v106d.html


The imitation by one computing device or program of another device or program. This allows the client and the server to conduct transparent access to networked resources. VT100 is one of the most common telecommunications emulations.
www.ala.org/rusa/mars/glossary.html


Software that you load on an Apple Mac computer to make it work like a PC operating system so Windows applications can be run.
www.ephotozine.com/glossary/index.cfm


Recreation of a system that will behave just like an original computing environment based on detailed specifications of that environment. [Arms, 2001, p. 260.]
digitalib.geometaphors.com/west/glossary/


A network activity in which a computer acts as if it is another kind of computer or terminal. An example is when a Macintosh user opens a remote terminal session to a VAX, it may run a program that emulates a DEC VT240 terminal.
www.zocalo.net/tng/glossary/glos_e.html


Hardware or software, or a combination of the two, that behaves like another device or program, like PCs emulating dumb terminals.
www.acc-net.com/Kahuna/glossaryE.htm


A technique that allows a piece of software or hardware to ‘act’ like another in order to cooperate with otherwise incompatible products. A very common use of emulation is using a printer with certain types of software.
www.visionsofadonai.com/onrampglossary2.html


ambition to equal or excel
www.cogsci.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/webwn


(computer science) technique of one machine obtaining the same results as another
www.cogsci.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/webwn


effort to equal or surpass another
www.cogsci.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/webwn




There for a GBA cannot emulate itself.

:p  :p  :p  we'll be on page2 in no time
LOL :lol:
doesnt anyone else think this is taking up valuable space, what with all the quotes.
maybe
maybe not
Not really valuable space. Is this getting loled soon you think?
No, because it's not funny.

Actually, yes, for the same reason.
oww. my finger hurts from spinning the scroll thing on my mouse to fast.
 
Last edited by a moderator:
S

sebastian_insua

Guest
taras posted on Oct 22 2004 at 08:31 PM said:
Yuglooc posted on Oct 22 2004 at 07:08 PM said:
falken80 posted on Oct 22 2004 at 07:02 PM said:
Vimacs posted on Oct 22 2004 at 06:35 PM said:
PAUL103DOGS posted on Oct 22 2004 at 08:27 PM said:
sam fisher posted on Oct 22 2004 at 05:10 PM said:
pAiN posted on Oct 22 2004 at 06:09 PM said:
Good job Sam.. top notch explanations. *emulates Sam Fisher*

thats not emulation. Here is a definition of emulation:

Definitions of EMULATION on the Web:

The imitation of a computer system, performed by a combination of hardware and software, that allows programs to run between incompatible systems.
www.rvcomp.com/wiring/EIA/glossary.htm


Refers to the ability of a program or device to imitate another program or device. Many printers, for example, are designed to emulate Hewlett-Packard LaserJet printers because so much software is written for HP printers. By emulating an HP printer, a printer can work with any software written for a real HP printer. Emulation tricks the software into believing that a device is really some other device. Communications software packages often include terminal emulation drivers. This enables your PC to emulate a particular type of terminal so that you can log on to a mainframe. It is also possible for a computer to emulate another type of computer. For example, there are programs that enable an Apple Macintosh to emulate a PC.
www.5starsupport.com/info/glossary.htm


The process by which a device is built to work like another. For example, a chip can be designed to emulate another model and execute software that was written to run in the other design. The emulator can be hardware, software or both.
www.synopsys.com/news/pr_kit/eda_glossary.html


A process by which a computer imitates the actions of another computer, so that the imitating system accepts the same data and executes the same computer programs as the imitated system.
ccs.uchicago.edu/technotes/misc/Glossary/gloss2.html


behavior like another type of entity, usually as in "terminal emulation." Terminal emulation software such as Kermit, ZTerm or ProComm allows a desktop computer to emulate (act like, display data from, interactively log in to) a terminal on a multi-user server-computer in a remote location, over phone lines via modems at both ends, or via hardwiring.
cai.ucdavis.edu/instruction/netgloss.htm


The process of imitation (simulation) of one computer system by another. The imitating program, or device (emulator), accepts the same data, executes the same programs, and achieves the same results.
www.nuhorizons.com/Glossary/ComputerConcepts.html


A DIGITAL PRESERVATION STRATEGY whereby digital materials are stored in their original format as a bit stream and software and hardware emulators are employed to mimic the behaviour of obsolete hardware platforms and emulate the relevant operating system to allow for access.
www.leeds.ac.uk/cedars/documents/PSW01.htm


The imitation, performed by a combination of hardware and software, of all or part of one device, terminal, or computer by another, so that the imitating device accepts the same data, performs the same functions, and appears to other network devices as if it were the imitated device. Emulation allows programs to run between incompatible systems.
www.oregoninnovation.org/pressroom/glossary.d-f.html


Replication of a computing system to process programs and data from an early system that is no longer available.
www.cs.cornell.edu/wya/DigLib/MS1999/glossary.html


In mainframe computing, software that allows a PC workstation to "imitate" or perform as a mainframe terminal.
www.aits.uillinois.edu/glossary/glossarye.html


A means of overcoming technological obsolescence of hardware and software by developing techniques for imitating obsolete systems on future generations of computers.
www.dpconline.org/graphics/intro/definitions.html


Emulation is said to happen when a system, or a program, performs in the same way as another system. A computer can emulate another type of computer in order to run its programs. Sometimes terminal emulation is necessary in order for one computer to make a network connection with another.
www.aot.state.vt.us/CaddHelp/cadd/glossary/gloss_e.htm


A way to allow software to run on a processor it was not designed for. When you run an application written for a 68K processor (such as the Quandra) on a Power Mac (which has a PowerPC chip), it runs in emulation mode (which is slower than native code would be). Emulation mode requires an emulator, a piece of software that imitates the native processor. For example, the Power Macs have a 68LC040 emulator built into their ROM chips and can come with SoftWindows, an emulator that lets you run PC progams. Compare native.
www.lcmug.com/glossary_E.htm


The use of special control programs to make a new computer system "act" like an older one, thus enabling a business to execute its older programs while software conversion takes place.
www.indstate.edu/cape/glossary.html


To get a clear idea of exactly what Emulation is, you must first have a clear understanding of what the word "emulation" means. Quite simply put, emulation is the act of imitating another. You could say, for example, that a stunt double is "emulating" the real actor in the movie for certain shots. While the double may not actually be the actor, he does mirror him very closely. Software looks and acts just like the H card, and can actually convince the receiver that it is indeed a valid H card. The important idea, however, is that if DirecTV ever sends down some sort of killer attack, it is just the software on a cheap floppy disk that could be potentially damaged as opposed to an expensive H Card. This is why emulation is so attractive to DirecTV hackers.
www.dssmafia.com/dictionary.php


(1) The use of programming techniques and special machine features to permit a computing system to run programs written for another system.
www-3.ibm.com/software/network/commserver/library/publications/csaix_60/dyyl1m05.htm


The imitation of all or part of one device, terminal, or computer by another, so that the imitating device accepts the same data, performs the same functions, & appears to other network devices as if it were the imitated devices.
www.connectworld.net/iec/Browse02/GLSE.html


– The imitation of a computer system, performed by a combination of hardware and software, that allows programs to run between incompatible systems.
www.liquorstorepos.com/html/Glossary.htm


Using software which makes a PC behave as though it were a terminal, or which alters the characteristics of a user's terminal to act as a different type of terminal.
www.uic.edu/depts/accc/inform/v106d.html


The imitation by one computing device or program of another device or program. This allows the client and the server to conduct transparent access to networked resources. VT100 is one of the most common telecommunications emulations.
www.ala.org/rusa/mars/glossary.html


Software that you load on an Apple Mac computer to make it work like a PC operating system so Windows applications can be run.
www.ephotozine.com/glossary/index.cfm


Recreation of a system that will behave just like an original computing environment based on detailed specifications of that environment. [Arms, 2001, p. 260.]
digitalib.geometaphors.com/west/glossary/


A network activity in which a computer acts as if it is another kind of computer or terminal. An example is when a Macintosh user opens a remote terminal session to a VAX, it may run a program that emulates a DEC VT240 terminal.
www.zocalo.net/tng/glossary/glos_e.html


Hardware or software, or a combination of the two, that behaves like another device or program, like PCs emulating dumb terminals.
www.acc-net.com/Kahuna/glossaryE.htm


A technique that allows a piece of software or hardware to ‘act’ like another in order to cooperate with otherwise incompatible products. A very common use of emulation is using a printer with certain types of software.
www.visionsofadonai.com/onrampglossary2.html


ambition to equal or excel
www.cogsci.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/webwn


(computer science) technique of one machine obtaining the same results as another
www.cogsci.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/webwn


effort to equal or surpass another
www.cogsci.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/webwn




There for a GBA cannot emulate itself.

:p :p :p we'll be on page2 in no time
LOL :lol:
doesnt anyone else think this is taking up valuable space, what with all the quotes.
maybe
maybe not
Not really valuable space. Is this getting loled soon you think?
No, because it's not funny.

Actually, yes, for the same reason.
Reply to the post above (not the quote)... This!
 
Last edited by a moderator:

davey g

Bitches and hos
Joined
Jun 25, 2003
Messages
948
Age
32
Location
Staffordshire Uni, Stafford
Website
www.belfastskate.has.it
sebastian_insua posted on Oct 22 2004 at 08:00 PM said:
taras posted on Oct 22 2004 at 08:31 PM said:
Yuglooc posted on Oct 22 2004 at 07:08 PM said:
falken80 posted on Oct 22 2004 at 07:02 PM said:
Vimacs posted on Oct 22 2004 at 06:35 PM said:
PAUL103DOGS posted on Oct 22 2004 at 08:27 PM said:
sam fisher posted on Oct 22 2004 at 05:10 PM said:
pAiN posted on Oct 22 2004 at 06:09 PM said:
Good job Sam.. top notch explanations. *emulates Sam Fisher*

thats not emulation. Here is a definition of emulation:

Definitions of EMULATION on the Web:

The imitation of a computer system, performed by a combination of hardware and software, that allows programs to run between incompatible systems.
www.rvcomp.com/wiring/EIA/glossary.htm


Refers to the ability of a program or device to imitate another program or device. Many printers, for example, are designed to emulate Hewlett-Packard LaserJet printers because so much software is written for HP printers. By emulating an HP printer, a printer can work with any software written for a real HP printer. Emulation tricks the software into believing that a device is really some other device. Communications software packages often include terminal emulation drivers. This enables your PC to emulate a particular type of terminal so that you can log on to a mainframe. It is also possible for a computer to emulate another type of computer. For example, there are programs that enable an Apple Macintosh to emulate a PC.
www.5starsupport.com/info/glossary.htm


The process by which a device is built to work like another. For example, a chip can be designed to emulate another model and execute software that was written to run in the other design. The emulator can be hardware, software or both.
www.synopsys.com/news/pr_kit/eda_glossary.html


A process by which a computer imitates the actions of another computer, so that the imitating system accepts the same data and executes the same computer programs as the imitated system.
ccs.uchicago.edu/technotes/misc/Glossary/gloss2.html


behavior like another type of entity, usually as in "terminal emulation." Terminal emulation software such as Kermit, ZTerm or ProComm allows a desktop computer to emulate (act like, display data from, interactively log in to) a terminal on a multi-user server-computer in a remote location, over phone lines via modems at both ends, or via hardwiring.
cai.ucdavis.edu/instruction/netgloss.htm


The process of imitation (simulation) of one computer system by another. The imitating program, or device (emulator), accepts the same data, executes the same programs, and achieves the same results.
www.nuhorizons.com/Glossary/ComputerConcepts.html


A DIGITAL PRESERVATION STRATEGY whereby digital materials are stored in their original format as a bit stream and software and hardware emulators are employed to mimic the behaviour of obsolete hardware platforms and emulate the relevant operating system to allow for access.
www.leeds.ac.uk/cedars/documents/PSW01.htm


The imitation, performed by a combination of hardware and software, of all or part of one device, terminal, or computer by another, so that the imitating device accepts the same data, performs the same functions, and appears to other network devices as if it were the imitated device. Emulation allows programs to run between incompatible systems.
www.oregoninnovation.org/pressroom/glossary.d-f.html


Replication of a computing system to process programs and data from an early system that is no longer available.
www.cs.cornell.edu/wya/DigLib/MS1999/glossary.html


In mainframe computing, software that allows a PC workstation to "imitate" or perform as a mainframe terminal.
www.aits.uillinois.edu/glossary/glossarye.html


A means of overcoming technological obsolescence of hardware and software by developing techniques for imitating obsolete systems on future generations of computers.
www.dpconline.org/graphics/intro/definitions.html


Emulation is said to happen when a system, or a program, performs in the same way as another system. A computer can emulate another type of computer in order to run its programs. Sometimes terminal emulation is necessary in order for one computer to make a network connection with another.
www.aot.state.vt.us/CaddHelp/cadd/glossary/gloss_e.htm


A way to allow software to run on a processor it was not designed for. When you run an application written for a 68K processor (such as the Quandra) on a Power Mac (which has a PowerPC chip), it runs in emulation mode (which is slower than native code would be). Emulation mode requires an emulator, a piece of software that imitates the native processor. For example, the Power Macs have a 68LC040 emulator built into their ROM chips and can come with SoftWindows, an emulator that lets you run PC progams. Compare native.
www.lcmug.com/glossary_E.htm


The use of special control programs to make a new computer system "act" like an older one, thus enabling a business to execute its older programs while software conversion takes place.
www.indstate.edu/cape/glossary.html


To get a clear idea of exactly what Emulation is, you must first have a clear understanding of what the word "emulation" means. Quite simply put, emulation is the act of imitating another. You could say, for example, that a stunt double is "emulating" the real actor in the movie for certain shots. While the double may not actually be the actor, he does mirror him very closely. Software looks and acts just like the H card, and can actually convince the receiver that it is indeed a valid H card. The important idea, however, is that if DirecTV ever sends down some sort of killer attack, it is just the software on a cheap floppy disk that could be potentially damaged as opposed to an expensive H Card. This is why emulation is so attractive to DirecTV hackers.
www.dssmafia.com/dictionary.php


(1) The use of programming techniques and special machine features to permit a computing system to run programs written for another system.
www-3.ibm.com/software/network/commserver/library/publications/csaix_60/dyyl1m05.htm


The imitation of all or part of one device, terminal, or computer by another, so that the imitating device accepts the same data, performs the same functions, & appears to other network devices as if it were the imitated devices.
www.connectworld.net/iec/Browse02/GLSE.html


– The imitation of a computer system, performed by a combination of hardware and software, that allows programs to run between incompatible systems.
www.liquorstorepos.com/html/Glossary.htm


Using software which makes a PC behave as though it were a terminal, or which alters the characteristics of a user's terminal to act as a different type of terminal.
www.uic.edu/depts/accc/inform/v106d.html


The imitation by one computing device or program of another device or program. This allows the client and the server to conduct transparent access to networked resources. VT100 is one of the most common telecommunications emulations.
www.ala.org/rusa/mars/glossary.html


Software that you load on an Apple Mac computer to make it work like a PC operating system so Windows applications can be run.
www.ephotozine.com/glossary/index.cfm


Recreation of a system that will behave just like an original computing environment based on detailed specifications of that environment. [Arms, 2001, p. 260.]
digitalib.geometaphors.com/west/glossary/


A network activity in which a computer acts as if it is another kind of computer or terminal. An example is when a Macintosh user opens a remote terminal session to a VAX, it may run a program that emulates a DEC VT240 terminal.
www.zocalo.net/tng/glossary/glos_e.html


Hardware or software, or a combination of the two, that behaves like another device or program, like PCs emulating dumb terminals.
www.acc-net.com/Kahuna/glossaryE.htm


A technique that allows a piece of software or hardware to ‘act’ like another in order to cooperate with otherwise incompatible products. A very common use of emulation is using a printer with certain types of software.
www.visionsofadonai.com/onrampglossary2.html


ambition to equal or excel
www.cogsci.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/webwn


(computer science) technique of one machine obtaining the same results as another
www.cogsci.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/webwn


effort to equal or surpass another
www.cogsci.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/webwn




There for a GBA cannot emulate itself.

:p :p :p we'll be on page2 in no time
LOL :lol:
doesnt anyone else think this is taking up valuable space, what with all the quotes.
maybe
maybe not
Not really valuable space. Is this getting loled soon you think?
No, because it's not funny.

Actually, yes, for the same reason.
Reply to the post above (not the quote)... This!
I can't believe I read this.
 
Last edited by a moderator:
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top