Battery In Dingoo A320


lenny81

Still Fresh
Joined
Apr 28, 2010
Messages
6
Hello together,

I am not so sure about the battery in the Dingoo A320. Of course, it is described as 3,7 V - 1700 mAh. But I dont know if the battery is
- Li-Ion or Li-Polymer type
- the necessary electronic circuit included in the battery pack or on board
- the circuit is "stand-alone" or controlled by software.

In Dingux I have seen that the voltage of a fully charged battery is around 4,7 V. If we talk about an Li-Ion-Battery this is too much (needed 4,1 - 4,2 V maximum).

Also I am not sure about the safety circuit. The circuit has to balance the different cells in the pack, safe the cells from being over-charged and preventing the cells from total discharging. If the circuit is doing this, everything is ok. But if the board and the native firmware is controlling this, there could be a problem with Dingux if this is not implemented.

I would be happy about any informations about this.

Thank you!
 

lenny81

Still Fresh
Joined
Apr 28, 2010
Messages
6
Right! Can you see an electronic circuit in the battery pack, next to the connectors? The pictures at dealextreme are not good enough.
 

surt

Member
Joined
Sep 6, 2008
Messages
106
Location
Brisbane, Australia
Website
surtspixels.googlepages.com
The replacement batteries from DX say they are LiPo so I should expect the same holds for the original Dingoo battery.

The batteries have a small PCB which looks to have a couple of chips on the underside, whch I guess would be the charge circuit.

dingoobattery1.jpg

dingoobattery2.jpg
 

lenny81

Still Fresh
Joined
Apr 28, 2010
Messages
6
Thank you!
Ok, its an LiPo type of battery. That means, the highest possible voltage on the battery should be 4,2 V - else the battery lifetime will decrease very much faster as normal.
I will have a look next time my Dingoo is fully charged. The battery voltage can be read from /proc/jz/battery in Millivolts. If it tells me 4,7 V again, I just can hope its a mismeasurement.
The PCB on the picture seems to be the balancer / charge circuit, yes. So the battery pack should be protected against over- and undercharging (operating range 3,0V - 4,2V). I will have a look on that.
 
Top